Can a puppy learn well from more than one person training it?

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Can a puppy learn well from more than one person training it?

This is a discussion on Can a puppy learn well from more than one person training it? within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Hii! Sorry if this is a frequent question here! We got a border collie pup recently, he's 6 months old, we have had him for ...

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Old 06-16-2018, 12:22 PM
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Can a puppy learn well from more than one person training it?

Hii!
Sorry if this is a frequent question here!

We got a border collie pup recently, he's 6 months old, we have had him for 4 months and he is truly devoted to my mom.
Unfortunately she has failed to train him. He knows to sit when he wants something, but not on command. He also knows touch, when it involves treats, so he is plenty smart, but not very obedient ( i get it hes a puppy) but our other dog (9 yo sprollie, has perfect manners and was dilidently trained by mam and his happy to listen to most people in the household)

He has no concept of manners and more worryingly has began to get quiet aggressive about things -pushing him down off of the couch, with a firm "no" (he has never been allowed on the couch) or telling him to go to his bed, with kind of coercing with a hand to his collar and leading him there, now results at him snapping and trying to bite people that arent my mom.

My mom takes him with her wherever she goes, and I understand the dog sees her as his master, but she isnt backing it up with any discernible training, and its becoming a bone of contention in the house, and a snappy collie is a big worry particularly as she works with kids

Would it be an option to try and split his training, whereby I could take over training him a few days a week, things like lead work, basic commands, away from my mom to try and help him understand that humans are "in charge", or would it be too difficult to train a dog that doesnt see you as its master?
And would it help open him up to the concept that other humans are also to be respected?

He's such a gorgeous and lovable dog, but he is a very brave, confident and super willful pup, who has learned that being bold will just result in him getting his way, Im worried this will be a problem later. He isnt neutered yet, but will be, and my mom is convinced that will iron out the majority of the problems.
Sorry if this is a confusing post!
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Old 06-16-2018, 06:16 PM
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The SAME person should be feeding the dog, training the dog, etc., but if your mother refuses, doesn't know how or just won't do what's in the best interest of the dog, then you need to consider another arrangement. You seem to have the impression that your mother is an inadequate "master" of this dog. This is incorrect. The dog is the alpha in the relationship. Unless you're ready to completely undo this, and as long as the dog is around children and is "snapping," you are on notice that a child could be injured or worse by this dog and you will be responsible. I hope you take this serious. I'm sure everyone wants the best possible outcome for all concerned.
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Old 06-16-2018, 09:24 PM
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I actually think it is highly beneficial for all members of a family to contribute to the care, feeding, and training of their dog. Create a loving, trusting, respectful bond between the dog and its family. But respect and trust must go both ways. Sometimes we expect a dog to respect us, but we do not train with respect or compassion or understanding of a dog's mindset. I don't need to be "alpha" or dominant or whatever else over my dog, but I do work on establishing a beautiful trusting bond with my three dogs.

But---- for the best outcome for the dog the training should be very consistent from everyone otherwise you end up with a very confused dog who doesn't really know what is expected of him/her. Then the dog can get yelled at or punished because it makes the wrong choices. A dog who snaps at their owners sometimes is doing so because he/she has no ideas what the proper thing to do is since the training is unclear or unpredictable. So to avoid getting punished or yelled at, it makes the first defensive move and snaps or bites. Certainly not always the case, but sometimes it does happen within a family.

Consistency and predictability is key in dog training and learning in general. A dog (or human) will continue to do what is reinforced or rewarded.

If you are willing to help your dog, I say go for it. Maybe your good positive influence will resonate with your dog. And just maybe, your mom will see all your good work, your dog's new great behaviors, and then she will get on board with you!!!

Dogs learn pretty darn fast when you train them with fun, compassion, respect, and lots of positive reinforcements like awesome praise and YUMMY FOOD!

I suggest you study online and watch utube videos from positive reinforcement trainers like kikopup to learn great methods of teaching new behaviors!!

Good luck and thank you for wanting to help your dog!
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Old 06-16-2018, 09:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenFrog View Post
a snappy collie is a big worry particularly as she works with kids
You sound like a very responsible (young?) person and that is very refreshing to hear! You are absolutely correct that a snappy dog is a big concern, esp around children. Children are unpredictable, loud, fast, etc and and can be very stressful to some dogs. And children don't generally know too much about dog safety which can easily end with a child getting hurt around a dog that has learned to use his teeth to get his message across.

Age and time don't generally fix most dog's problems. Usually the more the dog practices the negative behaviors, over time the problems worsen as they learn what works. So if your dog snaps at human's hands, your dog has found that this stops the stressful behavior from the human.

Thank you for recognizing the potential problems and wanting to help your dog to make better choices!!!
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