Bringing a wild puppy inside a store

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Bringing a wild puppy inside a store

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Old 01-15-2018, 01:48 PM
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Question Bringing a wild puppy inside a store

Hello-

I have a 6 mo old puppy. She is a wild child, constantly wanting to jump on people. We are in a training class right now and trying to get her to greet people appropriately. However, she doesn’t greet ME appropriately yet, which I am diligently working on. There are quite a few stores, like home improvement and sporting goods stores close by that allow (sometimes welcome) dogs inside. The trainer thinks we should bring our dogs inside these places to have different experiences and greet a variety of people. I do not want to do this. I keep my puppy on a very short leash in public. Even though she cannot get to people, she still jumps toward them, and ends up standing on her back legs, pulling against the leash (it’s attached to a harness) until the person walks by. I do not believe this is a dog you should take into a store. But part of me is also like “how do you expect her to learn?” I don’t want to be the one to bring the dog into a store who ruined it for everyone else. I won’t take her to the dog park, either, because she will jump on every man, woman, and child she sees. And she is relentless with it.

I am waiting to find the magic technique to get her to stop jumping on me & my husband. Wouldn’t it make more sense to wait to get that down before trying it out with other people. I will admit that part of my reluctance is due to my introverted personality. I don’t like being the center of attention (especially for a negative reason), that’s impossible with Glitch. I don’t know if I am just looking for excuses, and by doing so, stunting her ability to be obedient. I really believe I need an outside opinion.
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Old 01-15-2018, 02:25 PM
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Oh it's hard when your puppy is...exuberant.

I'm all about setting up my dog for success, and it sounds like your gut is right, it sounds like putting her in that environment might be too much for her right now.

I like to have a ton of distance to start. So could you maybe find a park where she can see people from a far distance away? Calm behaviour can be rewarded with a treat, or a toy, or moving closer to the people. Behaviour you don't want (whining, jumping, lunging, barking...etc) results in you backing up and increasing distance. This is also something you can do with you and your husband.

What are you and your husband currently doing when she jumps?
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Old 01-15-2018, 02:28 PM
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Unfortunately, you do have to train in situations where unwanted behaviour has been occurring. But thats the last few steps. Try building your confidence too in mean time. I have recently taken on eddie, 9 mnth boderline collie. He jumps a LOT and i cant stand it. It must stop! I taught sit, then started increasing how long he has to sit. He gets ignored when i get home till he sits, then i have to calmly praise before he leaps out of position ? i also say no and turn my back on him if jumping when im sat down. Eddie is a wild child. He can contain his excitement in a sit for a few seconds now lol. Its a slow process. And i have to do this part of training after hes run off some energy first and just before his meal (when hes most willing to try). Meanwhile- learn how to manage behaviour when walking by moving out of the way when people pass till you are enogh away that even if he jumps no contact is made to passers by. Try your best to prevent dog practising jumping up, by teaching "watch me" with food n clicker. See google for videos. Once you can hold food out with stretched arms and dog gives/sustains eye contact and does not look at food. Thats the behavior learnt. You then gradually increase duration, distance then distractions. Then you can use this to get dog to focus on you n getting his reward not passers by. Long hard slog training. Im on week 6 n eddie will rush up to greet me, hits a sit n then its a race to click treat before he breaks the sit. I then move away so he has to follow not jump. Good luck!
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Old 01-16-2018, 12:11 PM
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Thanks for the idea of slowly building up distance. I think she might respond to that well.

As far as what we have tried, our first trainer said to put up a knee when she is going to jump and then push her off and say “off.” (Gently, not a kick in the slats or anything). Made no dent. Then, the second trainer said when pushing a dog with your knee like that, they think you are playing with them. I could agree with that, at least in the case of Glitch. The new trainer, said when you get jumped on, to turn around, so your back is facing her, and say “off.” But, when I do that, Glitch grabs the bottom of my pants leg and starts pulling it and barking. I can’t let her rip all of my pants or wear shorts all the time. So when she pulls that stunt, I will turn around and use “enough” to try and get her to stop barking (which rarely works). I believe this is exactly what she wants. She has figured out if she starts ripping my clothes, I will give her attention 100% of the time. The clothes-ripping is a pattern. If I am not paying attention to her (and she is positive the universe revolves around her), she will grab a sleeve or a pant leg or a shoe string and start pulling on it. The universe *did* revolve around her for a while in the beginning, because she was extremely ill, and I was always on death watch. I carried her around in one of those front backpacks all the time, and she slept next to me.

Sorry this is so long. Right now, I completely ignore her. She will jump all over me, and eventually she will go into an unofficial “down,” meaning she is poised to jump again, official down is when her rear end is relaxed to one side. Then I will give a lot of praise. It seems to be slowly working, as she no longer bolts out of the bathroom in the morning (she sleeps in there) and jumps all over me. During absences in the day, she is crated. I make sure she is settled down in the crate before I let her out, and the majority of the time she doesn’t jump on me. I am willing to take any and all suggestions on this. Thanks.
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Old 01-16-2018, 10:11 PM
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I love her name! So cute! What kind of dog is she?

When my Aussie pup was younger and even more excitable, I would physically leave the room for a minute when she wouldn't settle (I had a baby gate and would jump over that to escape her until she calmed down - it would take a while sometimes).

I like this game for a lot of reasons:


I would also ignore my puppy until she sat, then I'd calmly stroke her. If she got up, I'd immediately stop ignore her again. Rinse and repeat, lol. She is 10 months old now and still far from perfect, although she doesn't jump anymore. When we go out in public, if she pulls or whines to meet someone - we do a 180 and walk as far away as we need to her for her to be calm again. Sometimes I give her back-to-back treats as we walk by someone. It's a process!
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Old 01-16-2018, 11:56 PM
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I love “It’s Yer Choice” so much better than traditional “Leave It.” Glitch likes to learn tricks, she is just wired all the time, when we get the jumping and mouthing under control it will be much smoother sailing. It seems like “penalty walks” work for a lot of people, definitely going to use that technique.

Glitch is a German Shorthaired Pointer/Golden Retriever cross. The rescue wasn’t sure what her lineage was so we did a DNA test. She’s got some energy. Not as much as an Aussie, but plenty for me to handle!

She loves tennis balls, this is her patiently waiting for me to throw it.
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Old 01-16-2018, 11:58 PM
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I love its your choice training games! Simple n instantly effective Eddie the jumper, liked to barge passed n out the door. So he had a session of its your choice: sit and wait for me to go 1st, or i shut the door on her and we started again. He now always runs to doors and gates, sitting at each ?
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Old 01-17-2018, 12:04 AM
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She's so cute! Who can resist that face?

I really do like IYC. Can be applied to so many things!
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Old 01-17-2018, 11:15 AM
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Yes, the advice to build up distance is spot on. You want to create situations the puppy is almost sure to succeed at. Why continue to do things you know your puppy can't/won't do? Do things you know she will do, reward that, and build on it.

I would ask that you don't take her into a store until you are ready for more advanced challenges. It is not good for anybody if people bring dogs into stores that don't behave exceptionally well. It makes stores less apt to allow people to bring pets at all.

One more consideration. When you use the leash or other physical means (like pushing off) too keep a dog from jumping up, these quickly become normal. The dog learns that it can jump up and pull all it wants and that you will physically restrain her from going too far. Of course, if you get to that point where the dog is jumping up on a stranger, you may have to use the leash as an emergency measure, but it is best to not let it get to that point.

The behavior becomes MUCH more reliable when you make it clear to the dog that she is entirely responsible for her own actions. So, if she is not heeling on a loose leash, that would be the first step. You have to put the onus on her to think about what she's doing. Otherwise, she will just stop thinking about it and jump/lunge at whatever pops into her head.

This takes a bit of maturity, but she is getting old enough now to handle that with some practice. Once you have her on a loose leash most of the time and responding to verbal reminders when she starts to pull, then you are ready to start approaching strangers. First, start at a distance where she might just start to pull at the leash. Then, just reminder her to return to the heel position. That's all you need. Just build up to getting closer and closer.

But, I would caution that if you don't have a pretty good loose-leash (or off-leash) heel first, then working on this jumping behavior is more difficult and the training outcome is typically less reliable.
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Old 01-18-2018, 12:25 AM
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I just thought I'd post this here because my puppy was a bit of a "wild child" today. We went to her breeder's house for a visit, and she is never more excitable than when she can smell her mom and dad, etc., and the humans that brought her into this world!

It took us a good 15 minutes just to get in the front door. On the way to the door, she would pull and so we would retreat. She'd pop back into heel, we'd walk a few paces, she'd get excited and vocal - we'd retreat. I could literally see the wheels turning...

Finally, we were able to make it across the threshold with her walking nicely in a heel - only to become excited again once inside! So we went immediately back out, and tried again. On the third try, she calmly entered the house and was able to do a few simple obedience commands. I'd like her to be able to recover quickly from those moments of major excitement/stress. I took her on a quick leashed tour of the living room, asking for simple behaviors every now and again, and when I felt certain that she was good to go, I released her to go play.

@Foswick - Love all of your advice on this forum. My breeder/trainer also works with SD's and their handlers (my puppy's mom is a working SD as well) and I have learned a lot! Mad respect for all the SD's out there and their handlers/trainers.
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