Brainstorming - reducing returns to rescues/shelters

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Training and Behavior

Brainstorming - reducing returns to rescues/shelters

This is a discussion on Brainstorming - reducing returns to rescues/shelters within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Starting a new topic since I think there's potential for additional discussion but I don't want to hijack San's thread any further. I'd like to ...

User Tag List

Like Tree9Likes
  • 1 Post By AlwaysTomboy
  • 1 Post By AlwaysTomboy
  • 2 Post By revolutionrocknroll
  • 1 Post By Laco
  • 1 Post By AlwaysTomboy
  • 1 Post By AlwaysTomboy
  • 2 Post By JohnR

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-26-2017, 04:16 PM
  #1
Senior Member
 
AlwaysTomboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: near Reading, PA
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Brainstorming - reducing returns to rescues/shelters

Starting a new topic since I think there's potential for additional discussion but I don't want to hijack San's thread any further.

I'd like to brainstorm ways in which rescues and shelters could, theoretically, reduce the risk of having adopted dogs returned. Not only is this detrimental for the dog to be bounced around, living with and bonding with one family only to be repeatedly abandoned, but for each dog that's returned, that's one less spot available to save another dog in need. I'll add that I can also see this being very emotionally difficult for the adopters in cases where they weren't properly informed about the dog's problems and didn't find out that the dog had severe issues beyond their capability to handle until after they've had the dog long enough to bond and become attached. I have far less sympathy for the adopters who return a dog simply because the dog is being a dog (or the puppy is being a puppy).

Also, I realize that most rescues and shelters are running on a shoe string budget and are doing the best they can with the resources they have. This thread isn't mean to be judgmental; it's more just brainstorming about things that could help taking into account budget and staffing and other constraints, what wouldn't help at all, and what the ultimate solution would be in a perfect world where there are no budget or staffing limitations.


Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysTomboy View Post
I wish more rescues and shelters and fosters had the resources to work with the high energy untrained dogs to give them at least a basic training foundation so they have a better shot at getting a permanent home.

-----

Semi-related anecdote: The rescue where I got Mira just had another dog returned: a cattle dog/cur/mystery mix who was rescued from a hoarder situation, adopted at approx 3-4 months old and returned at 7 months for being too high energy, lacking social skills and training, and overall is just, per the woman who runs the rescue, "bored in his current home and the cattle dog is coming through." )

As we can see with @LoveMyFosters, even very young pups can be taught basic things like sit; not with 100% reliability or for much duration, I wouldn't think, but enough to give the pup a start at knowing some basic obedience commands for the new owners to build on. It just breaks my heart because I can only imagine how stressful it is for the dog to be bounced around, and it makes me tetchy because a 3 month old dog is SO much more adoptable than a 7 month old dog who's still very much a puppy developmentally, but not so much in appearance, and now has had more time to develop bad behaviors.

& I'll step off my soapbox because I know rescuing and fostering isn't easy and I'm sure folks are doing their best and sometimes adopters just have unrealistic expectation.


Quote:
Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
At all the shelters where i've volunteered [or screened dogs to be pulled for rescue], & also in all-breed or breed-specific rescues, the LARGEST fraction of owner-surrendered dogs were intact males with minimal training, no leash manners, often dog-reactive / sometimes human-reactive, & without an off-switch.
They made up better than 60% of the pool of dogs needing homes.

If APOs would neuter their never-intended-to-be-sires & give them some training beyond maybe-housetraining & sometimes-Sit-for-a-treat, all those unwanted male dogs would have better odds of adoption -
that 60% of the shelter-popn weren't 'only' intact-Ms with virtually no training, they were also at that ideal PITA stage, 9-MO & sizzling with 5 to 7X as much circulating testosterone as a 12 to 15-MO adult male, to 12-MO with all the obnoxious learned behaviors of that super-male period.


Since the adopter got that pup at 3-MO & had him for 4-mos, i'd personally lay the responsibility for "Social skills & Training" directly at their feet.
He didn't *arrive* with behavior issues; he arrived as a normal untrained pup, & they signally failed to give him any schooling. That's not the dog's fault - nor is it the rescue's responsibility.

Q:
does this rescue mandate basic-manners training for all their adoptees?
That could greatly reduce their bounce-back rate; PACC had that in all their puppy contracts, & every adopter had to bring their pup or dog to a group class for a minimum of 6 weeks, possibly 12 - depending on the dog's age, & how well they [& the owner / handler] progressed.

re adopters' outrageous expectations,
I was at the Va Bch SPCA one day, shortly after the death of my Akita, for a dog-fix as a walker & to do some B-Mod on available dogs.
A woman in her late-20s / early-30s arrived with a ridiculously-cute pup in tow, a long-bodied black dog with soft curly coat, short drop ears, & no beard. I asked if i could meet her, she said yes, & i found her to be cuddly, not crazy, not mouthy, playful, & an absolute delight.
A few minutes later, i was checking in with the shelter manager, & overheard the woman - i thot the pup was *hers*, & was stunned to hear her say that she'd adopted the 12-WO 10-days ago, & was returning her "because she doesn't obey me".
She expected the puppy to come ready-trained, at 3-mos age.

I was heartsick over it, as i thot that pup was an absolute doll - but i knew my mother didn't want another dog in the house, despite my own wishes.
I spent the afternoon working with many other cute, hopeful dogs, but the one i remember was the pup who'd been rejected... because she was perfectly normal.
Of all the sad tales of unrealistic expectations, that one was - so far - the most-outrageous. I really, truly hope that there's never one that exceeds it.

- terry

leashedForLife likes this.
AlwaysTomboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 04:18 PM
  #2
Senior Member
 
AlwaysTomboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: near Reading, PA
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
At all the shelters where i've volunteered [or screened dogs to be pulled for rescue], & also in all-breed or breed-specific rescues, the LARGEST fraction of owner-surrendered dogs were intact males with minimal training, no leash manners, often dog-reactive / sometimes human-reactive, & without an off-switch.
They made up better than 60% of the pool of dogs needing homes.
In one of his lectures, Ian Dunbar said something about how it never ceased to amaze him that so many people relinquish dogs to a shelters for behaviors that are so easy to remedy, like not being housebroken or not being taught proper manners like not to jump on people, etc. That's why he's such a huge proponent of puppy owners working with the dog asap, getting it into puppy classes, teaching the basics, making sure it's housebroken, because those behaviors that are cute or not that big a deal for a little puppy quickly become deal breakers when the dog is an adult. It leads to a downward spiral in which the dog's behavior continues to decline and culminates with the dog being abandoned and having a good chance of being put to sleep. Truly tragic.

Sadly, I can kind of understand that the average dog owner may not have the knowledge or means or skill to know how to work with and handle a reactive or aggressive dog, especially one with severe problems. I try not to judge in that case. We know that there are often better options than surrendering the dog, and that in a lot of cases a dog that's labeled "aggressive" often isn't, and a reactive dog isn't necessarily dangerous, but I don't blame uninformed parents, for example, with such a dog not wanting to take the chance that the dog will hurt their kids.

-----

In a perfect world, I guess I'd like to see owners who are surrendering reactive/aggressive dogs get a chance to consult with a behaviorist to determine if the dog is truly dangerous, and if not, they could be given the option of working with the behaviorist for a few sessions to learn methods of helping the dog overcome his issues. The cynic in me thinks that even if this weren't cost prohibitive to implement, most folks wouldn't be willing to take the time and would dump the dog anyway. Those who would be willing to do what it takes to keep the dog are probably the folks who take to the internet and do the research and figure out for themselves what they need to do give the dog the best chance of staying a member of their family anyway.

I wonder if there's a way for rescues and shelters to do a sort of outreach to the community, provide eduction about basic training techniques and how to resolve common behavior problems; maybe community events in which attendees are given a clicker and a pamphlet on clicker training 101 (I could see that being geared towards kids, even); somehow get the word out about the CARE protocol with a list of local behaviorists for those people who are willing to work with their reactive dogs but don't know where to start. Before I got Mira and started researching how to help her overcome her reactivity problems, I didn't even know a dog behaviorist was a thing. I didn't know about the CARE protocol until I started poking around and asking questions here. I know rescues do adoption "meet the dogs" type events and offer services like microchipping of existing pets for a small donation. That could be a good environment to also do offer info on training and behavior modification. (I don't get out much. This kind of stuff may be already happening out there. )


Quote:
Since the adopter got that pup at 3-MO & had him for 4-mos, i'd personally lay the responsibility for "Social skills & Training" directly at their feet.
Well, since the puppy came from a pet hoarding situation, I figured it was possible he didn't receive much human interaction during the first 3 months of his life and missed out on some socialization there that could mean he needed remedial work and extra effort to catch him up to where a pup born in a healthier environment would be at that age.

You're right, though; not entirely the rescue's responsibility. I'd say the rescue's responsibility in this case would be to evaluate the pup; determine if there is delayed socialization; and thoroughly educate and inform potential adopters about the pup's background including potential special needs, and make darn sure they know they're getting a high energy, high drive, mixed breed and what that means as far as the pup's needs; and evaluate the potential adopter's home and lifestyle to see if there's any evidence that they won't be able to give the pup what he needs.

Quote:
Q:
does this rescue mandate basic-manners training for all their adoptees?
That could greatly reduce their bounce-back rate; PACC had that in all their puppy contracts, & every adopter had to bring their pup or dog to a group class for a minimum of 6 weeks, possibly 12 - depending on the dog's age, & how well they [& the owner / handler] progressed.
No, I'm sure this rescue doesn't do anything like that. It's owned and operated by one woman and a few part time volunteers. There's no doubt in my mind that her heart is in the right place, but my personal opinion is that she's maybe a bit too determined to saving as many dogs as possible and perhaps should shift her focus slightly to rescue fewer dogs and put more resources towards making the dogs she has as adoptable as possible.

Honestly, though, I'm in no position to judge for several reasons: 1) I've never been involved in the operation of a rescue or shelter and it's easy for me to sit back here and opine on what I think rescues and shelters should do differently when I know most are doing their best as it is, and 2) I benefited from her lax placement requirements since she was willing to give me a chance with Mira even though I was lacking several things that she initially wanted Mira's adopter to have (a fenced yard and an active household with kids in the family).

-----

I very much like the idea of a mandatory basic obedience class for adopters and their new dogs. Do you know who paid for it and what were the repurcussions for noncompliance?

I was thinking about this the other day and the best I could come up with was for rescues and shelters to provide adopters with a book either on raising a puppy or on adult dog training and managing behavior problems. I could see some folks being offended by the assumption that they don't know what they're doing. I guess a book won't really have any info that isn't already available on the internet, but at least they'd have a resource in hand at the ready.


Quote:
re adopters' outrageous expectations,
...was stunned to hear her say that she'd adopted the 12-WO 10-days ago, & was returning her "because she doesn't obey me".
She expected the puppy to come ready-trained, at 3-mos age.
Oh, good lord. She gave the poor thing 10 whole days to be the perfect dog at 3 months old with no effort on her part. Here's hoping she got herself a nice, cute, inanimate, puppy plush toy after that since she obviously wasn't ready for the living, breathing kind.[/quote]

Something tells me there's no way to educate that kind of person enough for her to have realistic expectations.
leashedForLife likes this.
AlwaysTomboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 05:52 PM
  #3
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Boston metro-area, USA
Posts: 1,885
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Lightbulb underutilized resources - & they're *free!*

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysTomboy View Post

...
I very much like the idea of a mandatory basic obedience class for adopters and their new dogs.
Do you know who paid for [the classes], and what were the repercussions for noncompliance?
...
We called it "manners" to avoid that OBEY word, Too many ppl take 'obedience' very seriously - they'd want to behead dogs who didn't comply, vs realize or admit that their own training was the root cause.

The adopters paid a nominal fee per class; the trainers donated their time, either running the class or handling dogs who had not yet been adopted, who were in foster care.
The class-fees were used to cover some of the cost of gas, for the foster dogs being ferried in, & for the cost of supplies [buckle collars, 6-ft leashes, toys to fetch / chase / kill to replace toys that wore out].
Toys were often bought at consignment stores for kiddie gear; infant-safe sturdy washable toys with STITCHED eyes [not pop-out plastic 'coin' eyes, to swallow!] are perfect for dogs. I paid as little as 50-cents for wonderful toys on clearance.

'Noncompliance' meant PACC could take the dog back. Relinquish / repossess was written into the adoption contract, & was one of the clauses they had to initial as 'understood'.


Proofing is critical in dog-training, b/c dogs are so slow to generalize [while humans are often too fast].
APOs often never proof, & then wonder why their 5-MO pup won't come when called at the beach... with 6 dogs romping & running, joggers, fisherfolk with stinky bait & lunch-boxes, picnics on blankets, a sloping water's edge to wade or splash in, gulls to harass, sandpipers to chase, dead-things to roll on, & all the rest.
They look astounded, & say things like, "She NEVER did that before!...", as she runs off beside the jogger, or "...but he comes running to me, at home in the yard!"

Two free training-resources that are massively underused:
- the downloads on DogStarDaily, &
- Levels Training, the original freebie, with built-in proofing.

DogStarDaily offers both of Dunbar's books, 'Before U get Ur puppy...' & the companion, 'After...
They cover everything - housetraining, chew-toys to prevent destruction, teaching bite INHIBITION, the works.

A:
Free downloads | Dog Star Daily

B:
Training Levels (originals) | Mind to Mind

- terry
leashedForLife is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 09-26-2017, 07:19 PM
  #4
Senior Member
 
revolutionrocknroll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Vermont
Posts: 2,800
Mentioned: 161 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I LOVE my local shelter- I've been volunteering there on and off for years and I'm currently fostering a senior Cocker Spaniel for them.

They invest so much into their animals- my foster is going to have an eye removed, several teeth removed, and spayed before she is available for adoption. They've done heart surgeries, luxating patella surgeries, eye surgeries on their animals. The ones with behavioral or obedience issues, they're very honest with their adopters and have local trainers donate a behavior consult or training sessions to go along with the dog's adoption so the owners can learn how to work with it. They also have dog training classes that are run by a few different local trainers at the shelter and give discounts to the adopters of shelter dogs. They do so much for their animals and for the community. They also have this program called the "Good Neighbor Program"- if an owner loses a job, housing, is a victim of domestic violence, etc, they'll board and feed the animal for free while the owner gets back on their feet.

I'm so impressed with how much time, effort, and money they put into their animals, it's a million times better than the rescue I got my dog from- they misled me about my dog's luxating patellas, when I asked about health issues they said "we don't test for anything" and just said she's spayed and vaccinated. They didn't mention ANYTHING about any fear, anxiety, or behavioral issues, but I'm sure she must have been exhibiting some because as a 4-5 month old toy size puppy she was a day away from being euthanized at the pound before the rescue pulled her- I wonder why no one else was interested in what should have been a very adoptable dog? They just shipped her up to me and I haven't heard from them since. It's these rescues and shelters that just want to adopt out as many animals as possible without concentrating on making the right match or supporting the adopter or animal before, during, and after the adoption has been made. And I know so many that AREN'T honest with the adopters about health and behavioral issues- they just want to move the animals through.

That being said, my local shelter also knows when to call it quits and does euthanize animals for significant health and behavioral issues, and I respect them for that. They would never knowingly adopt out an aggressive/dangerous animal or an animal that would have a poor quality of life. I think there needs to be a balance like that, people working in shelters and rescues need to be able to make those hard decisions.

I think a big reason why they're able to treat and train so many animals prior to adoption is that they're excellent at marketing and also have good relationships with local businesses that will sponsor them and local vets and trainers that donate their services.
revolutionrocknroll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 07:39 PM
  #5
Senior Member
 
Laco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Southern California
Posts: 2,068
Mentioned: 32 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
When we adopted Samantha, the shelter had a behaviorist that worked with us, and watched the interactions between us and the dogs we considered adopting. When we focused on Samantha, she spent time with us, & after watching us with her, told us she felt she was a good match for us. She was so right, here we are 7 and a half years later, with the 'perfect dog'. I don't know if all shelters have behaviorist's, but IMO they should.
leashedForLife likes this.
Laco is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 09:02 PM
  #6
Senior Member
 
AlwaysTomboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: near Reading, PA
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
Two free training-resources that are massively underused:
- the downloads on DogStarDaily, &
- Levels Training, the original freebie, with built-in proofing.

DogStarDaily offers both of Dunbar's books, 'Before U get Ur puppy...' & the companion, 'After...
They cover everything - housetraining, chew-toys to prevent destruction, teaching bite INHIBITION, the works.

A:
Free downloads | Dog Star Daily

B:
Training Levels (originals) | Mind to Mind
HUGE fan of Ian Dunbar and the training resources on his website. Wish more folks knew about that resource. Absolutely invaluable.
leashedForLife likes this.
AlwaysTomboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 09:39 PM
  #7
Senior Member
 
AlwaysTomboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2017
Location: near Reading, PA
Posts: 340
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by revolutionrocknroll View Post
I LOVE my local shelter-
Dude, your local shelter sounds amazing!

Quote:
They also have dog training classes that are run by a few different local trainers at the shelter and give discounts to the adopters of shelter dogs.

They do so much for their animals and for the community. They also have this program called the "Good Neighbor Program"- if an owner loses a job, housing, is a victim of domestic violence, etc, they'll board and feed the animal for free while the owner gets back on their feet.
That's absolutely brilliant, both the training classes and the good neighbor program. Both are awesome ways to help owners keep ownership of their dogs instead of having to surrender them due to lack of training or because the owners can't afford to care for them.

Quote:
It's these rescues and shelters that just want to adopt out as many animals as possible without concentrating on making the right match or supporting the adopter or animal before, during, and after the adoption has been made. And I know so many that AREN'T honest with the adopters about health and behavioral issues- they just want to move the animals through.
It seems like that's not uncommon, and it's so unfortunate for both dogs and adopters. My local shelter is totally upfront to potential adopters about everything that is known about the dog, warts and all, so to speak.

I fell in love with a young adult dog there, a little brown collie/sheltie/mystery mix, and they told me straight up that she came from a puppy mill type environment so she wasn't housebroken and she was basically a puppy in an adult dog body - everything was new and scary to her and she was going to need a lot patient introductions to, well, just about everything; plus she was a Houdini level escape artist. As much as I loved the sweet, timid little thing, and have endless patience for shy dogs, I live alone and work long hours and I knew she'd need more hands on attention than what I could provide during evenings and weekends. I'm so grateful they were honest about her needs. I followed up a few weeks later and they said that she'd been adopted by a good family.

They also spend one on one time with the dogs and get them started on the basics like walking nicely on leash and sit/down, etc. I don't think they have a dedicated trainer or behaviorist on staff, though.

I just checked my local shelter's website and apparently they DO do outreach programs to local schools to teach kids about the importance of being kind to animals, pet safety and basic pet care and even about training and animal behavior and how to avoid common reasons pets are surrendered. Ha! Rock on.

Quote:
That being said, my local shelter also knows when to call it quits and does euthanize animals for significant health and behavioral issues, and I respect them for that.
I'm totally with you on this. I think kill shelters get a bum wrap. I appreciate that they're willing to give difficult to place animals a chance; animals that some non-kill shelters or rescues might pass over because they don't want to tie up a spot indefinitely if the animal doesn't get adopted.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Laco View Post
When we adopted Samantha, the shelter had a behaviorist that worked with us, and watched the interactions between us and the dogs we considered adopting. When we focused on Samantha, she spent time with us, & after watching us with her, told us she felt she was a good match for us. She was so right, here we are 7 and a half years later, with the 'perfect dog'. I don't know if all shelters have behaviorist's, but IMO they should.
That's awesome that you got to work directly with a behaviorist, and aye, in a perfect work, all shelters would have the means to offer the same service to all potential adopters.
leashedForLife likes this.
AlwaysTomboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 10:48 PM
  #8
Senior Member
 
JohnR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2017
Posts: 332
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I volunteer at a large shelter, and am working on a Masters of Science in an Animal Studies program. As a matter of fact, one of the courses I'm presently taking is on shelters and rescues.

There are a number of things that have been proven to limit the adoption failures and returns.
First, all dogs and cats should go through a behaviorist screening before being made available for adoption.
Second, there should be a second meeting of the adoptive family, including any other dogs, after the initial application is made.
Third, free training with phone support after adoption.
Fourth, follow up with the new owners - ask them about their experience with their new dog, and draw out any problems they're having.
JohnR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 11:19 PM
  #9
Banned
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Boston metro-area, USA
Posts: 1,885
Mentioned: 46 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Arrow MA shelters & rescues - most offer classes &/or beh. support after adoption

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysTomboy View Post

In one of his lectures, Ian Dunbar said something about how it never ceased to amaze him that so many people relinquish dogs to shelters for behaviors that are so easy to remedy, like not being housebroken or not being taught proper manners, like not to jump on people, etc.
That's why he's such a huge proponent of puppy owners working with the dog ASAP, joining puppy classes, teaching the basics, making sure the pup's housebroken, because those behaviors that are cute or not that big a deal for a little puppy, quickly become deal-breakers when the dog is an adult.

It starts a downward spiral - the dog's behavior continues to decline, & ends with the dog being abandoned, & having a good chance of being put to sleep. Truly tragic.
...
I've never really grokked why folks have so much trouble with housetraining; the hard part, to me, is being AT HOME to get a pup or dog out, but the process is very straightforward, really.
Buyers of Dane pups seem to be much-more successful than Chi owners - & yes, i do think that the size of puddles & poops is a genuine deterrent for owners of giant-breed pups who don't get it right. That's strong inducement.

When i ran "summer camps" for kids to train their family-dog, i had kids from 8-YO to 12, handling dogs who weighed anything from 4# to 150#. Everybody got a Gentle Leader on the 1st day, i fitted it myself on every dog, & their 1st task was to teach the dog to like their halter, over the next week.
A single sheet of instructions went home with them, as well as a clicker - to practice with, AWAY from the dog.
A week later, every dog came to class wearing their GL without a single head-shake in the bunch. No failures. // If kids can do it, why do grown-ups find it so hard?
Every kid not only taught their dogs the basics [sit, down, stand, come, wait, stay, plus LLW], to be handled without fussing or fear, & to have a rectal temp taken, but every child had to make-up a trick & teach it as a final project.
Some were simple, others quite inventive, but all succeeded.

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysTomboy View Post

Sadly, I can kind of understand that the average dog owner may not have the knowledge or means or skill to know how to work with & handle a reactive or aggressive dog, especially one with severe problems.
I try not to judge in that case. We know that there are often better options than surrendering the dog, & that, in many cases, a dog that's labeled "aggressive" often isn't, & a reactive dog isn't necessarily dangerous...
but I don't blame uninformed parents, for example, with such a dog, who aren't wanting to take the chance that the dog will hurt their kids.
...
If more shelters & rescues *stopped* simply trying to sell the dog to any willing adopter as 'perfect', their yo-yo rates would plummet.
They might place fewer dogs, but those dogs would KEEP their homes more often, which would save operating costs & kennel-space. // Listing every dog as child-friendly or sweet or playful, etc, is asinine; some dogs really dislike kids under 10-YO, & it's not hard to see why, especially with parents who think that little Jane or Joey strangling the poor dog as they "hug" is just adorable.

Children need to learn apropos behavior toward nonhumans the same way they learn apropos behavior toward ppl; but just talk doesn't do it. ADULT ACTIONS are what kids emulate, & if U as the parent smack the dog or take things away from the dog or drag the dog along unwillingly... so will the child, with potentially terrifying results.

Boston's Animal Rescue League, locally famous, offers training classes - so does Angell Memorial [Pet] Hospital, which no, isn't mis-spelt.
Northeast Animal Shelter in Salem, MA, has classes, too.

There are literally hundreds of non-profit rescues in Mass.; all of them place dogs in foster homes B4 they're adopted, to assess them & fix the most-critical behaviors. Housetraining is #1, as many of these dogs from high-kill shelters in the S.E. & Mid-West have never lived in a house. Some are strays, picked up by ACOs; many are owner-surrendered.
All the rescue groups that i've encountered in the Boston-metro area provide behavioral support to adopters, by phone or e-mail. Some refer to a short-list of trainers for ongoing issues; others take back dogs who develop chronic problems, address the issue with an experienced foster, & re-place the dog in another home.

There are 8 pages of Mass. shelters & rescues on Petfinder, totaling 193 -
https://www.petfinder.com/animal-she...ame=&bystate=1

That's nowhere near all of them; many advertise directly to the public, & don't have a listing on Petfinder. // The 'pets' section on CraigsList Boston is quite pathetic, it's so small for a good-sized city; 4-M, 730-K residents in 2014.
By contrast, Norfolk, VA, had a mere 240-K residents in 2015, & Va Bch had almost 440-K.
Their CraigsList pet-pages run forever, & are constantly busy with registered rescues [501-3c], shelters, & many owners, listing pets for adoption, or fewer numbers of wannabe-owners looking for pets.

Mass. is a small state, but it's typical of New England in that 3 of 4 pets are S/N statewide, & 90% or more in urban areas; hence, our delightful regional problem of "importing" surplus pets from other states.
- terry

leashedForLife is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:56 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.