Biting Issues in Our New Rescue - Page 2

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Biting Issues in Our New Rescue

This is a discussion on Biting Issues in Our New Rescue within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Originally Posted by Shadowmom And no surprise that the last judgmental post got no response. So much for helping the op deal with being repeatedly ...

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Old 02-15-2018, 11:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shadowmom View Post
And no surprise that the last judgmental post got no response. So much for helping the op deal with being repeatedly bitten with a new large dog that they're trying to learn how to control.
Not everyone who reads this website is a positive only professional dog trainer who is educated in the perfect language to use to work with dogs.
Some people might actually be dog owners posting in desperation looking for helpful advice on how to deal with and stop destructive and scary behaviors. The quiet well behaved dog you see in the shelter can drastically change once you take him home and he feels that he has a home. And dogs can absolutely act like spoiled brats and their behavior can easily be compared to obnoxious kids at times, especially if you're not trained in dog behavior. It's a very easy comparison to make and people do the best they can think of. Having a seventy pound dog insistently jumping on and biting you to the point of bruising you can certainly feel very adversarial and scary especially if you're pregnant.
If the op asked for help, why would you feel entitled to lecture, bash and command her to throw away her shock collar when she specifically said it's the only thing that's working and she only has a few months to fix this problem or her husband will get rid of the dog for their newborn baby's safety?
Attacking the op isn't going to help her or the dog. It'll just drive her and probably many others away from this site and to look for help on other sites that are less critical and judgmental. Or maybe now they'll just give up and get rid of the dog after all.
Not a good way to educate anyone and not helpful to the poor pregnant poster who's in an emergency situation or to the dog keeping it's home. And what happens to dogs who get rehomed for biting?
You probably did a lot more harm than good being so judgmental and negative. There's much better ways to educate people.

Thank you!! I understand everyone else's posts but let me explain a little better. We tried the holding of his mouth and pinning him down twice. When it didn't work, we stopped immediately. We normally try and ignore him and walk away but that just keeps him going. We DO use positive reinforcement all the time so he knows he gets treats when he comes when he's called and when he sits. The problem is when we run out of treats because he's eaten them all from behaving well like he should and then he gets mad because he wants more. As for the collar, it has been a life savor but we use the vibrate mood to get his attention. We do not hardly ever use the shock. We've used the shock maybe 5 times total over the past 3 weeks. With the collar, when he starts biting and jumping and ignoring him or walking away doesn't work, we vibrate him. He's learning to sit his butt on the ground and that's when he gets tons of praise and a treat, if available. Just this week, even just showing him the remote makes him stop and sit and again, we praise him.

I want to reiterate that we have owned many dogs and this is the only one that we have felt the need to purchase a collar. I have always been against the shock collars and I absolutely do not shock. Even the two times I have done it, it has been at such a low setting that I don't think he even noticed because he didn't stop.

Yes we would prefer not to use the collar but he tends to do this most of the time when he's running around out back on our property and he's full of energy. At this point, I can't go into another room or tie him to a tree and just leave him out there. I've tried distracting him with sticks which may work for a few minutes but he just starts right back up. I would love to figure out what's triggering it so we can stop it before it starts. I'm thinking it's more of either too much energy or him wanting attention.

Thank you for those of you who posted positive comments. As for the person who tried to compare my biting Rescue dog to a fetus inside my body- seriously!!? How does those 2 things can even be compared?? A baby rolling around inside your stomach is in no way comparable to a 70 point biting dog. You may want to actually think before you respond to someone.
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Old 02-15-2018, 12:48 PM
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OP you describe full out biting as bruising the skin. Sorry but that's not full out biting. Full out biting is what my own rescue did to me as I inadvertently touched his foot while settling him in one night. It was one single sudden bite and there was blood everywhere. And he is just a 50 pound dog, not a 70 pound one like yours. The next morning I was 2 hours in the surgery as they tried to figure out how to close the hole in my hand. That's full out biting.
The problem is the various negative things you have tried (and I can understand why you felt driven to them) have ultimately not helped. I'm sorry but I would ditch that collar. You are going to have to start from zero to establish trust and leadership. You can get the Click to Calm book from Amazon for immediate download on kindle. There are aspects of 'no free lunch/nothing in life is free' in it. Google those terms. I don't subscribe to it all but my boy had a massive turn around after implementing some of the recommendations.
Good luck.
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Old 02-15-2018, 02:07 PM
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She's already said the positive things aren't working either. Can you give him more consistent hard exercise and maybe puzzle toys to wear out his brain? I take my dog to the local dog park for one to three or more hours a day. I live in the city and don't have a fenced in yard and he doesn't like playing with me or people much, he really needs dog social time and rough and tumble dog wrestling and running to be happy, and ideally with his best buddies. When my work schedule is too busy I put him in doggy daycare all day so he can play non-stop.
My last dog didn't like other dogs so we played fetch daily and I made sure he got his required two hours or more of running and jumping daily his entire life. He needed that much til he hit ten or eleven.

Can you work with a trainer or take training classes? Biting to the point of leaving bruises isn't as bad as ripping your flesh open but it's still pretty hard depending on how easily you bruise and not at all pleasant.
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Old 02-15-2018, 08:39 PM
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Red face Oops - nope, not that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Srvan47 View Post

... for the person who tried to compare my biting Rescue dog to a fetus inside my body - seriously!!?
How [can] those 2 things... even be compared??

A baby rolling around inside your stomach is in no way comparable to a 70 point biting dog.

You may want to actually think before you respond to someone.
.


@Srvan47 -
I'm sorry, U've got the wrong end of the stick. I didn't COMPARE "a 70# biting dog" to a quickened fetus, kicking.

I made an ANALOGY -
between punishing the recently-adopted dog, who doesn't understand that he's done anything wrong, & punishing the fetus - who is equally innocent of deliberate wrongdoing, & is equally uncomprehending of aversive feedback.


The dog doesn't comprehend what he's done wrong; to boot, he arrived under a tremendous amount of stress, as witness losing bladder-control when yer hubby walked toward him with any object in his hand/s.


Consequences that include angry or loud voices, pinning him, clamping his mouth shut, & / or shocks from collar-electrodes, won't reduce his stress, reassure or calm him, or help him to learn what U DO want, in place of the current behavior.

So my suggestions, in order of execution, are:
- make the unwanted behavior unlikely or impossible [Mgmt].
- try to reduce his stress to a minimum, & proactively DS/CC any triggers.
- teach him what behaviors U want in any given setting or circumstances.
- reward the desired behaviors.


cheers,
- terry

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Old 02-15-2018, 09:14 PM
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Terry - I know that you are passionate and knowledgeable about dogs and positive reinforcement training. I might suggest, though, that you become more cognizant of your tone. I'm not sure that you realize it, but you do often come across as lecturing. Your posts tend to be very long and often filled with jargon, which may not mean much to a newcomer to this site. That's unfortunate, because I believe that you have a lot to share.

Srvan47 - Alas, I don't have any advice for you, but i wish you all well.
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Old 02-17-2018, 11:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Shadowmom View Post
Biting to the point of leaving bruises isn't as bad as ripping your flesh open but it's still pretty hard depending on how easily you bruise and not at all pleasant.
Indeed. Just to reinforce that I didn't mean to come across that bruising the skin is of no consequence. Of course it is and it needs to be stopped. It's just that Duke could probably do so much worse if he had a mind to.
It sounds from the description of Duke's background that he wasn't given proper training or boundaries and now in addition to likely insecurities, he is coping with a ton of energy and full blown adolescence.

Last edited by pineapple; 02-17-2018 at 11:08 AM.
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