Am I crating my dog for too long? - Page 2

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Am I crating my dog for too long?

This is a discussion on Am I crating my dog for too long? within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; I agree with LV Gloria. 9-10 hours in a crate is a seriously long time..and then 8 hours more at night... I don't see how ...

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Old 07-12-2018, 09:10 PM
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I agree with LV Gloria. 9-10 hours in a crate is a seriously long time..and then 8 hours more at night... I don't see how people think this is okay. Have you checked to see about a doggy daycare? The one near me is only 11.00/day and they get plenty of socialization and activity and their own space if they want to rest. To be the best pet parent you can be, think of what she really needs to be happy.
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Old 07-21-2018, 10:54 PM
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RIGHT ON, Gloria!!!

Crating your dog is outrageous! I've had dogs all my life and never ONCE crated any of them! And they all have been great family members.

It shows you are an incompetent owner. Take a class in dog training. Dogs are more sensitive than you realize. Treat your dog as you would want to be treated. Don't destroy your relationship with him/her.
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Old 07-21-2018, 11:18 PM
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@Palapaguy

Crating is not outrageous. I'm glad you've not had a seriously injured dog on crate rest or had to fly them cargo. Those two things are very stressful and having a dog that is crate trained makes them and prolonged vet visits and day care much less stressful for dog and owner.

Crating does not involve sticking a dog in a box. Well done crate training creates positive and safe associations with the crate.

Having a crate in the house also provides a dog with a safe space and another way to communicate to their people that they are tired or not okay with something. My sensitive dog whines and curls up in the spot her crate was when it's not available.

Like other training tools i.e. leashes, how you use it and appropriate fitting to size can make the difference between good handling and cruelty.
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Old 07-22-2018, 06:29 AM
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There's a bit difference in mentality between the US and other countries when it comes to crating, honestly.


Crate training has made housebreaking my dogs 100 times easier. You just KNOW that they won't have an opportunity to pee or poop in the house while they're in there, and that you will have a great opportunity to teach them as soon as they get out of it and you take them outside.


Other than that, typically my dogs stopped being crated during the day by 1... but I'm rarely gone longer than 3 hours anyway. If I had to be away 10 hours a day, and didn't trust my dog in the house, I'd gate off a hallway or something and leave my dog there instead - it's a very long time for a dog to be stuck in a box.
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Old 07-22-2018, 09:42 PM
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Chas I would NEVER fly a dog cargo, the incompetent airlines have neglected way you can also accomplish with leavingtoo many dogs who've wound up found dead on arrival, young active perfectly healthy ones. So that's inexcusable.
G5
Anything you can accomplish with crating a dog you can also accomplish by leaving it in it's own dogproofed room. A well known vet behaviorist came to see me to evaluate my dog's behavior to help me with severe separation anxiety when he was frantic and destroying my apartment. The behaviorist was concerned that the hallway area I was leaving him in was too small for him, which was a small room big enough to hold his crate and food and water bowls and space for him to stand and lay down outside the crate. It's the only area in my new apartment without any windows and he was breaking through windows trying to escape and go after me.
It's not good for their muscles, ligaments or skeletons to be cramped in a crate all day. My dog was petrified of crates and broke out of one at his last home. Wouldn't even go near one when I got him. Now he goes in and hangs out in there but I never lock him in as he gets stressed locked in. I only have locked him in briefly if repairmen have come over for quick things and were afraid or allergic. Long repairs I take him out or keep him right with me.
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Old 07-23-2018, 10:30 AM
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I consider crates to be sort of a necessary evil. I dont like the "idea" of crating a dog, but I feel like its necessary for alot of dogs, and most puppies. I personally dont see a whole heck of alot of difference between crating and having a dog loose in a part of the house, or being locked in a bathroom or kitchen or some such while the humans are away. For most intents and purposes, its still being crated just in a larger area. I've totally gone over to crating for puppies. Training in general goes much better using a crate ( less chance for the dog to practice bad behaviors ) and its absolutely great for potty training. Even when I worked from home I still crated my pup when I wasnt actively engaged with her. As for crating at night- I still wouldnt have a problem with it. My dog lays on his bed at night and is not allowed to roam about. He is trained to stay his butt on his bed. He doesnt have any more space than he would in a crate. I dont crate at night because he's trained to stay put. That was mostly accomplished by having him in a crate as a pup, at night the crate was put in the spot his future bed would go. We built a habit in him that at bedtime he settles down in that one spot. Yeah theres a line, like with anything, that can be crossed and too much is too much. I see it at work all the time. If your dog is trying to destroy his crate or using the bathroom in it, or going neurotic from over crating then something needs to change. But for those that are totally against crates, get a high drive puppy like a german shepherd, you'll see the value of the crate real quick. You cant watch a puppy every second, and for pups like gsds, if your not watching them and they're allowed to roam the house free......it would be like having a little fuzzy whirlwind of destruction running loose. The one I have now was opening cabinet doors at 12 weeks. He could open the front door by 6 months. A crate was a must for him. We had an ex pen for when he was small, but it didnt last long. You cant contain a determined puppy in an ex pen. Lock him in bathroom or laundry room? How is that any better than a crate? They can just get used to using the bathroom in the house that way. In a perfect world we wouldnt need crates, or leashes, or collars, or fences or anything else like that- but none of our dogs are perfect, none of our training skills are etc. That being said, I use the crate as a training and safety tool, and once my pups are trustworthy in my home I dont crate anymore. But some dogs for various reasons will never be trustworthy in the home. So crate it is. Like so many other things, a necessary evil.
JM2C
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Old 07-23-2018, 02:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sthelena View Post
I consider crates to be sort of a necessary evil. ... But some dogs for various reasons will never be trustworthy in the home. So crate it is. Like so many other things, a necessary evil.
JM2C
A necessary evil?! That's a copout for poor (or disinterested) owner behavior. Just try to imagine the stress THIS dog was under!

This news article reinforced my belief: Problems involving dogs are most often caused by their humans.
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Old 07-23-2018, 04:32 PM
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My dog took 4 cargo flights transferring country and was reported to be calm and a joy to work with. We'd put in 6 months of noise while in the crate training. She slept. I would have rehomed her if she showed significant distress at crate training because I wouldn't put her through something she couldn't cope with.

The 10 days of kennel quarantine was much more stressful.

What would you have had me do when I moved country? Rehome her? Then I'd be called a lazy, uncommitted owner and cause her the same relocation stress without the pack that she got to come home to.

As for being cramped. What kind of a monster do you think I am? Her crate is huge, set to international flight standards for all companions.

The way she was trained she chose the crate, we had the livingroom ex-penned so she could play and at around 8 months she'd go into the crate open doored and not come out the entire time we were away from the house.

Would I love it if all rentals and holiday houses came with dog friendly rooms? Yes.

Would I love it if my dog didn't have to be kenneled at day care or the vet? Yes.

Would I have preferred to take my dog in cabin? Yes.

As these things aren't really available to me I do what I can with training and conditioning to make my dog's life easier given the challenges she will face.

The only place Echo's crate door is closed these days is in holiday rentals at night.

My sister has a dog I wouldn't crate train due to her high anxiety levels and previous mistreatment in a dog run, her life is more restricted and scarier for it. She can't even stay in the recovery pen at the vet, we are lucky we have a fear free clinic willing to have her tag along to chores.
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