Adult Dog is afraid of new puppy.

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Adult Dog is afraid of new puppy.

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Old 12-03-2017, 05:32 AM
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Adult Dog is afraid of new puppy.

Hey guys,

I have a full grown about 4 y/o male Wolf mix.
He was trained heavily (and properly of course) by myself. he's always been a very submissive dog as I wanted to make sure he was due to his breed.
he is pretty much a perfect dog, walks perfect off and on leash, listens to all commands, etc.
We recently adopted a female beagle for my mom (around 1-2 years old). She lives in our place with us. My male was very interested when we got her but over the next day or so got used to her and now they're perfect together.

our friends dog recently had puppies and we decided to get one. (7 week male husky mix)

We got the puppy about 2 days ago. our dogs sniffed the puppy in the car and treated it perfectly.
The beagle got used to the puppy and was great with him instantly.
As I said our big dog is very submissive and is a little scaredy cat.
Our roommate has a cat and he wont dare to go near it after it hissed at him once and gives him his own space.

Our big dog is super scared of the puppy. Our big dog pretty much bolts from the puppy whenever the puppy walks over to him or tries to play. The cat doesn't want anything to do with the dogs but the puppy is another story of course.
The big dog goes up to the puppy just fine and sniffs but when the puppy is initiating he's scared. Not like shaking anxiety scared just keeps his space.

The beagle will give the puppy a little growl when he get's too annoying but nothing out of the ordinary when it comes to puppies and adult dogs teaching the puppies what's okay and what isn't.

We do just fine in the day giving our adult dog and the puppy their space and slowly getting him used to the puppy but at night I can't be as vigilant as the puppy wakes up sometimes and wants to go play with our big dog and since I'm sleeping I can't do much.

last night the puppy went over to him and scared him when he was sleeping. Our big dog gave a little bark and a small growl as he was walking away.
Now the beagle I've heard her have little warning growls but our big dog has never growled at anything in his life. I didn't even know he knew how to growl or do anything other than roll over on his back around other more dominant dogs.
Should I be worried?
Is there anything I can do to get him used to the puppy?
Don't want any dangerous new behavior. (I don't think he would EVER do anything to the puppy but at the end of the day they are dogs.)
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Old 12-03-2017, 03:40 PM
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Exclamation To confirm: a 4-YO M wolf-hybrid, a 1 to 2-YO F Beagle, & a 49-DO M Husky-mix?

Quote:
Originally Posted by imanon View Post

I have a full grown about 4 y/o male Wolf mix.
He was trained heavily... he's always been a very submissive dog as I wanted to make sure he was due to his breed.
he is pretty much a perfect dog, walks perfect off and on leash, listens to all commands, etc.
We recently adopted a female Beagle... (around 1-2 years old). She lives in our place with us. My male [hybrid] was very interested when we got her but... got used to her and now they're perfect together.

our friend's dog recently had puppies and we [took one] - 7-WO male husky mix.

We got the puppy about 2 days ago. ... The Beagle ...was great with him instantly.
...
Our big dog is super scared of the puppy... pretty much bolts ... whenever the puppy walks over to him or tries to play. ... when the puppy initiates, he's scared. Not like shaking... just keeps his space.

... at night I can't be as vigilant as the puppy wakes up sometimes & wants to play with our big dog and since I'm sleeping, I can't do much.

last night the puppy went over & scared him while he was sleeping. Our big dog gave a little bark and a small growl as he walked away.
...I've heard the Beagle give little warning growls, but our [4-YO hybrid] has never growled at anything in his life.
I didn't even know he knew how to growl or do anything other than roll over on his back around other more dominant dogs.
Should I be worried?
...
I don't think he'd EVER do anything to the puppy, but at the end of the day, they're dogs.
.

U have a puppy who's 5-weeks short of having a working sphincter on his bladder & his bowel, & U don't have a crate?

That's over a MONTH of scheduling ahead; as he's now 7-WO, he can currently only go TWO HOURS between scheduled potty-trips, plus an added trip every time a trigger occurs.
Triggers include
- wake from sleep [nap, overnite, anytime]
- after a meal or any large drink
- any exciting event [someone wakes up & enters the room, a delivery, a visitor...]
- after active play [5-mins of chasing a toy, out to pee...].

The rule for scheduling a pup is, Age in Months + 1 = Max # of hours between potty trips.


Re the pup & the hybrid -
I'm guessing the 4-YO is intact?, as he was "very interested" in the F Beagle when she arrived.
I'd neuter him immediately, if he's still intact. It's not a silver bullet, but it does decrease aggression.

2, I'd get a crate for the puppy - a proper airline-approved shipping kennel, & the pup would be in it, within arm's reach of me in bed, every night.
When i housetrain, the crate doubles as my nightstand; the bedside lamp, my current book, the leash, the collar, some shelf-stable tidbits, are all on the crate roof.

3, i'd set my alarm for 3-AM every night from now until the pup is about 15-WO.
I'd get up & put a coat or robe over my PJs, slip on shoes or boots, pick up the leash, collar, & goodies, open the crate, & PICK UP THE PUPPY & CARRY the pup outside, then put on collar, clip on leash, & set Pup down in a likely spot that he's used as a toilet B4.
Then i wait... in a minute or less, there should be pee. // Praise warmly & quietly, give a tidbit or 2 on the spot, as soon as he rises from his squat, & go back indoors.

Lead the pup to the bedroom, close the bedroom door, crate the pup, doff the coat & kick off the shoes, go back to bed.
Elapsed time, under 10-minutes; clean dry pup, clean dry crate, no drama.

I would never leave a puppy, or indeed any dog of any age, including a healthy young-adult dog, with a wolf-hybrid of any age, UNSUPERVISED. I'd want to monitor every interaction - but then again, i wouldn't own a wolf-hybrid.

Hybrids are neither fish nor fowl; they belong nowhere, they can't be set free, they don't do well as house-pets, the vast majority are insanely destructive, they often don't want to meet or deal with non-family humans; they will bite with force over petty things, that dogs take in stride [being interrupted or restrained or re-directed; EX, the hybrid wants Ur breakfast, & U put an arm across to block his nose from Ur plate; U may be badly bitten].

- terry

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Old 12-03-2017, 04:19 PM
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I would get your male husky a crate to sleep in at night Just for safety. I think wolf hybrids are awesome! They still have Wolf in them and see things in their den or area of sleeping as a threat. I would hate to see your husky die because it went over to the dog while it was sleeping. You could put the crate in your room as soon as you hear him start moving take him outside. If he doesn't make noise. I would set an alarm for 2am and 4am so there is no chance of accidents

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Last edited by Markie; 12-03-2017 at 04:28 PM.
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Old 12-03-2017, 04:26 PM
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Do they play okay together??

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Old 12-03-2017, 07:15 PM
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Hey guys,
1st off A BIG MISCONCEPTION HERE
My adult boy IS NOT a wolf hybrid. I suppose I should of been more specific.
his mom was a malamute, husky, dominant mix.
There was a small part wolf there. and his dad was a shepherd, collie mut mix.
I'll attach picture so you guys can see he is most certainly not a wolf hybrid.
I don't feel I would be capable of having a real wolf or wolf hybrid because I would want experience in training a bread like that.

in reply to terry.
I've had many dogs and many puppies. He has a crate and is being crate trained and potty trained very well. I've been through it many times and have always been successful in short periods of time. But that was NOT my question or concern haha. Just lookin out tho so thank you.

In reply to Markie.
I have always slept in my bed with my dogs until they are old enough to decide whether they want to sleep on the bed or on the floor.
I feel it really helps with the bonding when they're young.
I would really like to avoid making him sleep in a crate.
Once again I know my adult dog would never fatally harm the puppy. I just don't want him to hate the lil guy or have animosity towards him as he grows up.
They don't really play together but I would like them to eventualy do so. The puppy will try to play but my big dog just walks away. I think he might think the puppy is another cat haha.
My adult dog will go up to the puppy and touch noses or sniff him but when the puppy wants to initiate he get's spooked.
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Old 12-03-2017, 07:22 PM
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Here's a pic of the adult boy so you can get a better idea.
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Old 12-03-2017, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imanon View Post
Hey guys,
1st off A BIG MISCONCEPTION HERE
My adult boy IS NOT a wolf hybrid. I suppose I should of been more specific.
his mom was a malamute, husky, dominant mix.
There was a small part wolf there. and his dad was a shepherd, collie mut mix.
I'll attach picture so you guys can see he is most certainly not a wolf hybrid.
I don't feel I would be capable of having a real wolf or wolf hybrid because I would want experience in training a bread like that.

in reply to terry.
I've had many dogs and many puppies. He has a crate and is being crate trained and potty trained very well. I've been through it many times and have always been successful in short periods of time. But that was NOT my question or concern haha. Just lookin out tho so thank you.

In reply to Markie.
I have always slept in my bed with my dogs until they are old enough to decide whether they want to sleep on the bed or on the floor.
I feel it really helps with the bonding when they're young.
I would really like to avoid making him sleep in a crate.
Once again I know my adult dog would never fatally harm the puppy. I just don't want him to hate the lil guy or have animosity towards him as he grows up.
They don't really play together but I would like them to eventualy do so. The puppy will try to play but my big dog just walks away. I think he might think the puppy is another cat haha.
My adult dog will go up to the puppy and touch noses or sniff him but when the puppy wants to initiate he get's spooked.
Give me just a minute to answer you back taking out my baby husky right now and I completely agree with you All of mine sleep in my room

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Old 12-03-2017, 07:31 PM
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Just my opinion ,,, but I think they will eventually become good friends.
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Old 12-03-2017, 07:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by imanon View Post

Here's a pic of the adult boy so you can get a better idea.
He is Adorable!! Can definitely see the Malamute!! I wouldn't worry about the crate since it's a Malamute husky mix they should just start bonding at some point as you already know they are stubborn the puppy will get to the older male with it any issue just let it be. I'm not to worried about the den thing now thanks just let it work it self out. Malamutes are big babies so I don't see anything wrong with just letting the puppy run with the Malamute. Cats I have two cats in my room when the huskies are out I have two betas puppy goes near cat betas get on to it they don't do it anymore. The Malamute should teach the puppy Your good

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Old 12-03-2017, 07:55 PM
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Talking "no dogs in bed" - My bed, canine-free, thanks.

.

none of my personal dogs have ever slept in my bed - with or without me.
So far, all of my dogs easily "got attached" to me - unfortunately, so did some clients' dogs, & dogs who weren't yet ready to be adopted [in rescue custody, but they needed B-Mod before being listed]. Michele kept reminding me that the liver Dalmatian with pica just adored me, "& she really needs a home that understands her..." No, thank U.

I've crated all my pups beside my bed, & I also crate-trained / housetrained adult dogs the same way, for clients -
they quickly relax when they realize everyone's sleeping in the same room, but IME, they don't need to share the bed; dogs don't typically sleep piled atop one another or even directly beside one another, as adults - they do that as neonates, b/c they can't control their own core-temp, & need the warmth of their littermates & / or their dam to prevent chilling.

Pups 8-WO & over are sufficiently independent that they don't sleep in puppy-piles, anymore. They may sleep as a group activity, but physically, they scatter.

I did wonder why U got a pup a week earlier than is generally considered a good age to separate a pup from their siblings & their dam?
Did the breeder send off all the pups at 7-WO? -
In the U.S., that's illegal in some states / cities, & per Federal law, it's illegal to cross state-lines with any puppy or kitten under 56-DO / 8-WO unless the whole family goes, as a package deal.

That means if one pup in a litter is sick, & needs vet attn, but the litter is less than 8-WO, & the nearest vet is in the neighboring state, every pup goes - sick or well, & mom-dog, too. [This happened repeatedly in Va Beach; the small towns just over the N.C. border often had no vet, so they "came to the city" to get their dogs treated].

- terry

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