10 week old puppy nipping like a maniac - tips please? - Page 2

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10 week old puppy nipping like a maniac - tips please?

This is a discussion on 10 week old puppy nipping like a maniac - tips please? within the Dog Training and Behavior forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; leashed for life - haha, yes the older child is the boy, the younger is the girl. It's a busy house! The older child is ...

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Old 12-14-2017, 08:54 PM
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leashed for life - haha, yes the older child is the boy, the younger is the girl. It's a busy house! The older child is pretty good with puppy, able to keep him relatively calm. My littlest is just more wiggly and bouncy, so even though she's not doing the things you listed, the "bounce" in her five year old self's step is just... enticing? Her very presence seems to excite puppy - her voice, her movements. She sits on the ground a lot, which looks like an invitation to play to puppy... her long hair swishes around her when she moves about, also enticing! And when he does nip and mouth her, she just hasn't gotten the hang of leaving promptly without trying to lecture him to stop and then squeaking a bit, lol. Poor thing, she just wants to cuddle him, and he just wants to play play play with her!
We took him to his first puppy class and he was the total life of the party, soooo playful and bouncy with all the other puppies. I think he'll be easier to manage around the kids once he has all his shots and we can take him out to play with other dogs more (and just OUT more in general).
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Old 12-14-2017, 09:57 PM
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Exclamation Ruh-roh.

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Originally Posted by tmer View Post


...
I think he'll be easier to manage around the kids once he has all his shots and we can take him out to play with other dogs more (and just OUT more in general).
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Are U in the UK? - he's 10-WO; U have exactly 2-weeks remaining to jam all his primary socialization into, AND his habituation, before the close of Primary.

Forget the shots, forget the rumor of Parvo-virus on every square-foot of sidewalk, * GET HIM OUT* today, now... please.

See this Open Letter from DVM Anderson -
http://www.trainyourdogmonth.com/mem...dmrkletter.pdf

... & take it to heart.
The risk of a dog dying b/c of inadequate socialization or habituation is far, far greater than the risk of contagious disease - behavioral euthanasias in the USA kill more dogs than contagious disease AND traumatic injuries, together; every year.

Simple common sense will keep Pup safe - don't take him where hordes of other dogs have defecated for years on end; walk on paving rather than soil; & give Pup a clean surface to void on, by providing an unfolded puppy-pad or a newspaper to squat on; bundle it up, pee or poop together, & discard.

He needs to meet at least 100 wildly-varied friendly strangers by week 12 - U have 2 weeks to meet 50 ppl per week.
AND every meeting is managed, to make it socially comfortable & a happy experience for the puppy.
This is not "pass the pup around at the pub" - this is controlled, one to one intros to ppl who are every variety of person U can find - diet, language, manner, size, skin color, age, clothing, accessories, noisy abrupt ppl, quiet polite ppl, brash teens, squealy pre-teen girls who giggle, boys who make motor noises & pretend to be airplanes.

Good luck - & hurry!
- terry

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Old 12-14-2017, 10:05 PM
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Question What's the difference in 21-days?

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lest U think i'm trying to murder Ur innocent wee pup, i'll give U 2 very illuminating statistics.

1:
85% of all 5-WO pups who contract Parvo virus will die of it, even if given 24 / 7 attendant care in a vet hospital.
U can spend a grand in 7-days time; it's very unlikely to save the puppy.

2:
85% of 8-WO pups who contract Parvo virus will survive with decent home nursing, & no vet care.
Offering electrolyte fluids, keeping them clean, giving simple easy-to-digest light foods with lots of protein.

What's the difference? - AGE. The 8-WO pup is past the critical vulnerability to Parvo, the 5-WO is not; the younger pup has a very-rapidly growing, far-more permeable intestinal lining than the older pup.

take heart, be brave, & get the puppy out in public.
- terry

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Old 12-15-2017, 04:05 PM
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Thanks for the info leashedforlife. Very interesting! I get SOOoooo much conflicting advice from everyone, it's crazy. The puppy class leader is on your side, my vet scolded me for walking him in our neighbourhood (!), as did my dog walker friend. So, I am walking him on sidewalks and around people a lot, but staying away from dog areas.
When I wrote that we need to get him out more in general, I meant to places where he can burn physical energy and meet lots of dogs, and just run a bit more freely, as we have a tiny yard. So far he has met at least three new people per day since we have brought him home, including a visit to my daughter's kindergarten class, a number of dinner parties, a walk through Staples and Home Sense, and many encounters with neighbours and strangers on the sidewalks, in our housing complex and at the cafe. So I think we are doing ok on the human-socialization front, just having less success on the dog socialization front. He has had one puppy class and today he had one puppy play date, and that's it! And he LOVES dogs, and he loves playing, so I feel badly we don't have more puppy friends for him.
I can't wait until we can just take him everywhere with us!
But I am happy to see your comments, as I will feel more confident when I am going against my vet, taking him out!
We are in Canada.
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Old 12-15-2017, 05:57 PM
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Question

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how about a Meetup just for puppies, somewhere fenced? - a tennis court, a sports field, something?
Post flyers, or list it on CraigsList. :-)

- t

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Old 12-15-2017, 10:42 PM
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Meh. The over-emphasis of the "critical period" is probably does just about as much damage as good. It is talked about as if your puppy can be socialized up to some number of weeks (depending on whom you ask), and the very next day, no socialization is possible.

Socialization starts at birth and lasts a lifetime. Puppies are more impressionable with certain experiences when they are younger, but it doesn't shut off over night - or ever.

My advice to anyone socializing a puppy is to just relax. There is no rush. It is way more important to do it right than to do it fast. Just make sure they have good experiences with a broad range of situations, but have fun and relax. Good socialization is not about exposing your puppy to as many situations as possible. It is about making sure they have good experiences with the situations they encounter.

In the mad rush to get puppies out in public for maximum exposure, people tend to overexpose and don't give the puppy a clear, calm, and consistent way to experience their environment. Some puppies figure it out for themselves, and some don't. It's a little bit of a gamble.

Understand, though, that I'm coming from a position of training service dogs. So, one misstep during socialization can disqualify the dog from service and set us back a couple of years. So, we don't like to make that gamble. The average pet owner probably doesn't need to be quite so intentional, but the overall idea of quality over quantity still holds true.
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Old 12-16-2017, 05:20 AM
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Arrow primary vs secondary socialization: cost / benefit

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yes, socialization continues to be possible - all the dog's life, it needs to be maintained to a degree, especially in guarding breeds, who require that the sort of intensive socialization U do with a gundog or companion breed till they're 3-MO be watered-down slightly & continue till they're 2-YO -
but if U have that nicely-socialized, tolerant, polite 2-YO Akita or Cane Corso & move out in the sticks, & that dog meets nobody but the next neighbor for 2 or 3-months, the next time U take them to the vet in town, they'll have regressed.
Guarding breeds need maintenance - take 'em to the post office, to the hardware store, into the bank, anywhere they can see folks that aren't family, & practice their social skills, even if that's only 'be civil'.

The problem with the 2ndary socialization period, 3-MO to 6-MO, is it's bl**dy hard work.
any 8 to 12-WO pup meets human strangers as eagerly as a hen picks up cracked corn; after they hit 12 to 14-WO, that slows down as they begin to become more judicious & critical in which particular humans they want to meet of the variety available; it literally takes twice as much work to achieve the same outcome, when the pup is 3-MO to 6-MO.
By 6-MO when territorial behavior is starting up, it takes 3 or 4X as much well-done, carefully-managed exposure to get the SAME level of results as U'd get in that same pup, when s/he was 8 to 12-WO.

So IME, it's a heckuva lot cheaper in time & effort to get in there & get it done during the primary socialization window, & done properly - not overfacing the pup, nor exhausting them, but giving them a good broad sampling of ppl who look, act, speak, dress, & move as differently as possible, who eat various diets [which emerges in body scent - that's why many Europeans think white Americans smell of faint sour-milk, like infants, 'cuz we drink a lot of dairy], & doing it when the pup's boundaries are as permeable as they'll ever be in their lifetime makes it easy.
I'd rather spend the time on the front end & accomplish it with minimal sweat, than put it off & have a harder job when the pup's older.

I've worked with born-feral pups, too, & believe me, a pup who never saw a human except from a distance B4 they hit 12-WO is a whole different critter from an 8 to 9-WO feral pup - the little ones become much-more trusting, so much faster, they might as well be a different species.
If that pup is an adolescent, 6-MO or older, when they come into care, they may never learn to relax in public or feel comfortable at a Bark in the Park event in their lifetimes - & not for lack of trying. They can go, sure, but they spend the time among the crowd tail down & eyes looking for escape routes - they're not hysterical with fear, but they're not happy, either.

Just taking a young pup to the local library or bank, & sitting on a bench outside to let them watch the world & its brother go by, is a worthwhile, even praiseworthy, low-stress exposure. Ppl-watching is good for seeing all the strange accessories that humans can wear, carry, push, pull, or ride on. No contact is needed, just let the pup see the human horde at a safe distance, & if someone nice comes along who'd like to meet the puppy up close & personal, that's gravy.

I'm not a lazy trainer, but any socialization or habituation that's missed & is done when the pup hits 6-MO or older is considered to be rehabilitative or B-Mod, not plain old garden-variety socialization & habituation, & i'd rather have gravity do the work for me, when the pup is a bitty thing that attracts humans like magnets do iron-filings... plus, the young puppy profits by it so easily & quickly, compared to an older pup.
It's the difference between a 15-YO youth trying to learn a new language, & a 4 to 5-YO child picking it up by immersion - it comes to them as easily as learning their mother tongue did, they just absorb it, vs struggling to learn a word or a phrase at a time.
Why make it any harder, when it can be both simple & pleasant early on?

happy training,
- terry
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