My dog's wound smells and looks horrible. - Page 2

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > Dog Health

My dog's wound smells and looks horrible.

This is a discussion on My dog's wound smells and looks horrible. within the Dog Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Originally Posted by Hiraeth UPDATE: They had to removed an extensive amount of tissue and skin. There was necrotic tissue. What I don't understand is ...

User Tag List

Like Tree10Likes

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-21-2016, 04:13 PM
  #11
Dog Forum ModeraTHOR
 
jclark343's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Florida
Posts: 9,233
Mentioned: 1658 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hiraeth View Post
UPDATE: They had to removed an extensive amount of tissue and skin. There was necrotic tissue. What I don't understand is how she became necrotic even if she were on antibiotics? Should I be upset with the first vet she went to?
I think these would be great questions to ask the vet when you pick her up. I mean I know dogs have a lot of bacteria in their mouths, and considering it was caused by a bite, maybe they didn't clean it out well enough? Who knows. I would definitely ask a ton of questions about why this happened and how you can prevent it from happening again. Sounds like your dog is under the care of a good vet now.
Hiraeth likes this.
jclark343 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2016, 04:31 PM
  #12
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 26
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jclark343 View Post
I think these would be great questions to ask the vet when you pick her up. I mean I know dogs have a lot of bacteria in their mouths, and considering it was caused by a bite, maybe they didn't clean it out well enough? Who knows. I would definitely ask a ton of questions about why this happened and how you can prevent it from happening again. Sounds like your dog is under the care of a good vet now.
She is under good care now. The vet she went to first is a mobile vet that was on site when she was attacked. They even said they were concerned about one patch of skin that appeared to be black; but not concerned enough.
Hiraeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2016, 10:16 PM
  #13
Senior Member
 
busannie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: MD
Posts: 442
Mentioned: 44 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I'm not a vet (and I don't even play one on TV!), but I think the necrotic/sloughing tissue associated with bite wounds is generally caused by two factors: lack of blood supply/trauma to the tissue, and infection due to the bacteria associated with the offending animal's dirty mouth. The first issue is most common with injuries where the tissue is severely traumatized/bruised/macerated, or where blood supply is compromised on one or more "sides" of the injury, which can cause the tissue to die. The issue of infection is something which antibiotics can help combat, but even they are not foolproof, and if both factors (tissue damage and infection) are in play, it's pretty common to have issues with necrotic tissue/wound sloughing. The problem is that the vet doesn't know when treating the initial injuries what areas of tissue will recover in, say, 3 days, and what areas will be dead and falling off, so they usually remove the obviously dead/irreparable stuff, and try to save the rest. If they removed all the "maybe" tissue with some of these injuries, that would be a large area, and they might not be able to actually close the wound due to lack of skin to oppose, and sometimes the "iffy" areas do recover. I don't think it's terribly uncommon for injuries like this to require more than one surgery, to debride necrotic tissue and "close the gap" between the healthy tissue edges. Some severe cases actually require specialist surgery, and/or skin grafts to repair large open wounds.

It can't hurt to either ask the current vet if they think the approach the first vet took was appropriate, or to contact the first vet and update them, and see what they say. It sounds like they may have been concerned about the one area of tissue, but maybe they saw something that led them to believe it was potentially still viable, you won't know unless you ask.

That said, I'm sure her licking and scratching was a huge contributing factor to the issues, and would either keep an e collar on to keep her off of it, or a lightweight shirt/sweater if the vet oks that (they may not want it covered, so be sure to ask). Good luck with her!
Hiraeth likes this.
busannie is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Old 10-22-2016, 12:35 AM
  #14
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 368
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Dog bite wounds are always unpredictable immediately after the bite occurs. Sometimes they heal routinely but often it takes 24-48 hours to discover the total damage caused by the bite as the areas that have lost circulation due to tissue damage finally rear their ugly heads, and the surgery sites often have to be redone thanks to all the new dead tissue and related uncontrolled infection that results (particularly if wounds caused by a larger dog- more yanking, pulling and tearing of tissues in those situations). We ALWAYS warn owners that there is simply no way to judge what is 'good' and what is 'bad' tissue right after a bite. You just have to guess and not be too aggressive removing tissues and just clean things as well as possible and plan on removing more in a few days (and if you don't have to after all, all the better). Whenever there is dead tissue, there will be uncontrolled infection and a bad odor... does not mean the incorrect antibiotics were selected, but it does mean the wound has to be thoroughly cleaned and debrided all over again and possibly resistant bacteria will begin to populate the wound (like the canine equivalency of MRSAs, called MRPAs)... makes final resolution of infection more difficult but certainly not impossible.
cookieface and Hiraeth like this.
lzrddr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2016, 01:28 PM
  #15
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Posts: 26
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
UPDATE: Mia will have to stay another night. She was supposed to come home today, but the doctor wants to keep an eye on her wounds a little longer. I feel good leaving her in his care, but my gosh, I really do miss her. My mom and I are going to visit her this afternoon. We visited her Saturday and she was so clingy. She cried so much when we had to put her back in the kennel. It broke my heart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post
I'm not a vet (and I don't even play one on TV!), but I think the necrotic/sloughing tissue associated with bite wounds is generally caused by two factors: lack of blood supply/trauma to the tissue, and infection due to the bacteria associated with the offending animal's dirty mouth. The first issue is most common with injuries where the tissue is severely traumatized/bruised/macerated, or where blood supply is compromised on one or more "sides" of the injury, which can cause the tissue to die. The issue of infection is something which antibiotics can help combat, but even they are not foolproof, and if both factors (tissue damage and infection) are in play, it's pretty common to have issues with necrotic tissue/wound sloughing. The problem is that the vet doesn't know when treating the initial injuries what areas of tissue will recover in, say, 3 days, and what areas will be dead and falling off, so they usually remove the obviously dead/irreparable stuff, and try to save the rest. If they removed all the "maybe" tissue with some of these injuries, that would be a large area, and they might not be able to actually close the wound due to lack of skin to oppose, and sometimes the "iffy" areas do recover. I don't think it's terribly uncommon for injuries like this to require more than one surgery, to debride necrotic tissue and "close the gap" between the healthy tissue edges. Some severe cases actually require specialist surgery, and/or skin grafts to repair large open wounds.

It can't hurt to either ask the current vet if they think the approach the first vet took was appropriate, or to contact the first vet and update them, and see what they say. It sounds like they may have been concerned about the one area of tissue, but maybe they saw something that led them to believe it was potentially still viable, you won't know unless you ask.

That said, I'm sure her licking and scratching was a huge contributing factor to the issues, and would either keep an e collar on to keep her off of it, or a lightweight shirt/sweater if the vet oks that (they may not want it covered, so be sure to ask). Good luck with her!
Wow. I truly feel like you just typed exactly how I felt about all of this.

I truly do not think it was the first vet's fault. I told her what happened, and she was very apologetic. I think she only had so much tissue to work with. I believe she thought the questionable tissue might have a fighting chance with the antibiotics; and since the wounds were so big, she probably thought it was necessary to give the tissue a chance to heal since taking it out would leave her very little options on repairing Mia without significant scarring.

I also believe that her licking and scratching contributed to 80% of this happening. She didn't start smelling like a corpse until Thursday night (and all of this happened 5 days prior).

Quote:
Originally Posted by lzrddr View Post
Dog bite wounds are always unpredictable immediately after the bite occurs. Sometimes they heal routinely but often it takes 24-48 hours to discover the total damage caused by the bite as the areas that have lost circulation due to tissue damage finally rear their ugly heads, and the surgery sites often have to be redone thanks to all the new dead tissue and related uncontrolled infection that results (particularly if wounds caused by a larger dog- more yanking, pulling and tearing of tissues in those situations). We ALWAYS warn owners that there is simply no way to judge what is 'good' and what is 'bad' tissue right after a bite. You just have to guess and not be too aggressive removing tissues and just clean things as well as possible and plan on removing more in a few days (and if you don't have to after all, all the better). Whenever there is dead tissue, there will be uncontrolled infection and a bad odor... does not mean the incorrect antibiotics were selected, but it does mean the wound has to be thoroughly cleaned and debrided all over again and possibly resistant bacteria will begin to populate the wound (like the canine equivalency of MRSAs, called MRPAs)... makes final resolution of infection more difficult but certainly not impossible.
Thanks for all the info! They told me that it's pretty common to have to do a 2nd surgery when there's a bad dog bite. I'm just hoping they didn't have to remove any muscle.
Hiraeth is offline   Reply With Quote
Dog Stairs - Dog Steps - Quality Pet Products
Reply



Thread Tools
Display Modes


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:32 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.