Dog with bad hips

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Dog with bad hips

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Old 01-29-2018, 10:05 PM
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Dog with bad hips

I own a Chihuahua terrier, sheís 4 years old and has hip issues, and her being well, *cough* obese hasnít helped her, obviously. Weíve been limiting her food, but she often goes over to eat her brotherís food that he leaves and saves for later. Iím starting to take her and her brother on daily walks, but Iím scared it might be detrimental to her hips or joints and/or leave them stiff.
1. How can I help her hips/joints?
2. Tips on her exercise?
3. How can I get her to stop eating her brotherís food without leaving him hungry?
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Old 01-29-2018, 11:25 PM
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That makes no sense, no offense. If the food is out and she's eating it so that she's obese then he's hungry anyway since he's clearly not getting it.

Separate them for meals. Keep him on his own room or crate or whatever until he eats his meal. After whatever amount of time remove his meal so that no animals can get it and then separate him and offer it to him later. Or do what I do. My dog's a poor eater do I literally stand there with him and nag him to eat until he finishes his meal. Sometimes I spoon feed him the first few bites, sometimes I literally put the first few bites in his mouth until he eats the rest on his own. I think he wants and likes the attention and also hates his prescription food for ibd and food allergies since he gobbles up food like Alpo that he's not supposed to have. But I get food into him.
If you don't keep her on a strict diet she won't be able to move at all, sad for a young small dog.
Follow whatever exercise your vet recommends. Walking might be ok. But overeating has to stop!
Keep them separated until he eats enough.
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Old 01-30-2018, 12:06 AM
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You cause obesity by not managing dogs at meal times. Swimming is less hard on joints of obese dogs. But risk of exercise is less than risk of obesity. Eat separately n take dogs for a walk often. Check mirror on way out.
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Old 01-30-2018, 03:01 AM
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There is so much to say here. Well done for recognising that obesity is a problem. A weight loss program needs to involve exercise, reducing diet to appropriate levels, only giving low fat treats and monitoring weight so food intake can be adjusted.
feed your dogs in different rooms. Have the food down for 20 minutes then take up any that remains uneaten. You can feed them smaller meals 2-3 times a day.
honestly diet is the main part of weight loss, exercise is greatly overestimated in the effect it has at the level most pets are exercised.
As for Arthritis, exercise should be enough that it doesnt cause more stiffness at the time or the following day, this will vary hugely between individuals. Yes, swimming is an excellent way to burn fat, protect the joints and maintain muscle.
There are lots of other things that can be done + sorry for the self promotion but I have a lot of content on both of these subject because they are so common. I would advise you start with my
and then move onto my
.
Obviously, working closely with you vet both to loose weight and best manage the arthritis will give your dog the best chance of being happy, healthy and pain free.
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Old 01-30-2018, 10:38 AM
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If she were my dog, I would have my Vet evaluate her hips, Xray's etc. Of course excess weight is hard on healthy hips, and especially so if there is any physiological problem. I'm sure your Vet will strongly recommend weight loss, which may be all she needs to significantly help her hip functions. Having your Vet check her, will get you the information you need to know how to best help her.
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Old 01-30-2018, 11:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kniverix View Post
I own a Chihuahua terrier, sheís 4 years old and has hip issues, and her being well, *cough* obese hasnít helped her, obviously. Weíve been limiting her food, but she often goes over to eat her brotherís food that he leaves and saves for later. Iím starting to take her and her brother on daily walks, but Iím scared it might be detrimental to her hips or joints and/or leave them stiff.
1. How can I help her hips/joints?
2. Tips on her exercise?
3. How can I get her to stop eating her brotherís food without leaving him hungry?

1. The BEST thing you can possibly do for her hips/joints is get the extra weight off of her. My Chi x Dach, Zody, has luxating patella in both knees, and at one point he was fat. His knees hurt him more so he did not want to do much but lay around and on walks he walked, no trotting for fat boy. Now that he's lost the weight and is down to his ideal weight he loves to run and play, he trots on walks. You can also start giving her fish oil, and a joint supplement. The supplement I used Is this one https://www.amazon.com/Response-Cety...or%2Bdogs&th=1

2. Start out slow and build up distance, if you notice her limping the next day take her on a very short walk of 1/2 to 1 block at most that day, and the next day when you take her on her regular walk (if she's no longer limping) do not let her do as much as on the day before. I had an elderly severely arthritic dog who still wanted to run, and I quickly learned that I could only let him run for maybe a block at the most then I had to slow him down, letting him run any further would result in at least a day of limping. We did still walk though, usually 4 or 5 blocks due to his age, he was also blind and got tired easily. Swimming is great if she likest the water, none of mine have.

3. You'll have to feed them on a schedule. When I had Shadow and Jersey they were fed 2x a day and on a schedule. They had around 20 minutes to finish their food, and they were fed apart from each other so no stealing went on. Zody is the only one I have now and since he is fed so little, around 1/2 cup of food and 16 cal worth or treats) a day, I divide the food up and feed him 3 to 4 meals per day. doing that he never really feels hungry, and there's the added benefit that the hunger pukes have stopped. How many meals you choose to feed your 2 is up to you, I'd recommend a minimum of 2 though, so that your boy has at least 2 chances to finish his food.
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