Body-wt vs "Condition" - fit isn't a number... - Page 4

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Body-wt vs "Condition" - fit isn't a number...

This is a discussion on Body-wt vs "Condition" - fit isn't a number... within the Dog Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Originally Posted by leashedForLife re RG, it's not so much a dog's "perception of plenty" as lack of competition / no interference that makes individual ...

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Old 08-31-2017, 08:30 AM
  #31
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Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post

re RG, it's not so much a dog's "perception of plenty" as lack of competition / no interference that makes individual dogs fail to display RG; for 'only' dogs, there's no other dog to "defend" food from.


I've seen "only" dogs exhibit RG. There are numerous threads in this forum which discuss this RG display in a home with just one dog. Others dogs are not the only creatures which can create the environment for RG to occur.
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Old 08-31-2017, 01:43 PM
  #32
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Arrow RG & 'only' dogs - some of my experiences

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Originally Posted by DriveDog View Post

I've seen "only" dogs exhibit RG. ...numerous threads in this forum... discuss ... RG ... in a home with just one dog.
in at least some of those cases, humans have previously messed with the dog's food, correct?

All too many owners have swallowed the guff from CM/DW that says U gotta be able to stick yer hand in the dog's bowl anytime U feel like it, unchallenged - it's a bad practice, undermines trust, & sets the dog up to fail. For dogs who have been harassed at mealtime since puphood, it makes eating a very stressful time of day.

I've had clients adopt dogs who had been pestered in this fashion, & sometimes it takes 4 to 6-mos of eating in a crate, no one bothering them, B4 they can relax at mealtime - not gobble, not hunker over their bowls, not constantly scan the room for approaching threats.


extremely-high value items can also trigger RG in dogs who've never shown it, B4.
A case in point, my Akita - at 6-MO, i gave her a meaty bone. She was lying on a mat in the kitchen, & as i walked past her at a distance of about 5-ft, she dropped her head over it, stopped chewing, avoided eye contact, & growled deeply.

I ignored it, gave her a few minutes, lured her away from it with a hunk of stinky cheese, CLOSED THE DOOR between kitchen & living-room [leaving her on the other side], & threw her lovely bone in the trash.
The mat went into the wash. // She did not get another bone until she was about 15-MO; much-more mature, a lot less defensive, & could be trusted to relax around familiar persons.
During that entire time, she didn't guard anything except a very-painful injury, & even then, her 'guarding' was limited to mutterings & slight stiffening when the bandage was changed, the wound was cleaned, or the long-sleeved shirt over it was changed.

Given that it was a 14-inch long incision, i thought that was pretty restrained - i'd have fussed a lot more than she did.

- terry

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Old 08-31-2017, 02:53 PM
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I'm guessing I am easily confused. Why in the world would you post " re RG, it's not so much a dog's "perception of plenty" as lack of competition / no interference that makes individual dogs fail to display RG; for 'only' dogs, there's no other dog to "defend" food from." and then in your answer to my question you cite " i gave her a meaty bone. She was lying on a mat in the kitchen, & as i walked past her at a distance of about 5-ft, she dropped her head over it, stopped chewing, avoided eye contact, & growled deeply."/???????. Your own personal experience has shown you that "only" dogs will and can definitely display RG at times.

My suggestion for you in the future if you have another pup and don't want to deal with the situation you went through with your Akita is to indoctrinate a pup either by hand feeding or holding the bowl and in the case with RMBs, just hold it as you allow your pup to gnaw away. I feed raw and at times need to take certain bones away from her when she gets them to a size where I am concerned she might try and swallow the remainder. There is no competition or stress and to the contrary the pup learns to completely trust the human around food through this easy process from day one. I continued the process by having the dog eat ( raw ) in a specific place and not drag RMBs all over the kitchen floor. She was placed on a large towel, her food given to her and as soon as the food left the towel, I would put it back on the towel with a verbal reminder to keep it on the towel. She learned the discipline in short order and eventually, on her own, would move RMBs back onto the towel.

Also, the trading up process has its merit I suppose but one always has to remember, there will come that day when one either has nothing to trade up with OR there is no item which the dog values more. Teaching a dog a solid "aus" accomplishes the same task so no trading up is required.
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Old 08-31-2017, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by DriveDog View Post

... in your answer to my question you cite "...i gave her a meaty bone. ...
Your own personal experience has shown you that "only" dogs will and can definitely display RG at times.

...
What's confusing?

I explained that an extremely-valuable item can trigger RG in a dog who's never shown any, B4.
A raw meaty-bone - her 1st-ever - was obviously one of those "extremely-valuable" items, for her.

I think that's a straightforward example.

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Old 08-31-2017, 03:13 PM
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Wow. This has gotten off topic....
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Old 08-31-2017, 05:07 PM
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Wow. This has gotten off topic....
Resource guarding / food guarding has arisen during wt-loss, calorie restriction, etc - that's why i mentioned it as a possible side-effect of "dieting".


- terry

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Old 08-31-2017, 06:05 PM
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Wow. This has gotten off topic....
LOL. Tis be the nature of threads when leashedForLife and I have exchanges.

Speaking of body weight vs condition, I just noticed my dog needs to harden up a tiny bit. My excuse is her overall exercise requirements have been lacking a bit due to the warmer summer weather, she loves the cold and tends to need more pushing when it is hot. "
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Old 09-02-2017, 01:59 PM
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You can induce weight loss by cutting food, but exercise (as well as more food) is required to actually condition a dog. In the ABDA, a registry where condition is weighted nearly as much as conformation, the former are referred to as "conditioned at the food bowl", and tend not to fare well compared to dogs that have been fed and exercised appropriately. That said, it's foolish to try and condition a dog who is overweight, so usually decreased food to get closer to a goal weight, then increased food/exercise to condition, would be the chosen route. I keep my dog at a fit weight year round, and condition him (to varying degree) a couple times a year, sometimes for an event, but sometimes just because that's the direction our activities take us .

FWIW, in my sample size of 2 dogs who had food decreased (without filler even) for weight loss, neither experienced increased resource guarding. One already did (only to other animals), but stayed at the same level, the other never has. The non-RG dog does value food a bit more now that she's not stuffed like a thanksgiving turkey, but the RG dog is and always has been hungry all the time.

ETA: A good comparison for people is to make a fist and run the fingers of their other hand over the knuckles: too thin. Then open hand and run fingers over the back of the hand: just right. Then open the hand and run fingers over palm: too fat. It's a good one for the average pet owner, and easy to consult if you need a refresher

Last edited by busannie; 09-02-2017 at 02:03 PM.
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Old 09-02-2017, 02:44 PM
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Thumbs up Good demo, like it!

Quote:
Originally Posted by busannie View Post

...

ETA:
A good [tactile] comparison that people [can use]:
make a fist, & run the fingers of their other hand over the knuckles of the fist: too thin.
Open the fist, & run fingers over the back of the hand: just right.
Then... run their fingers over the [open] palm: too f-a-t.

It's a good one for the average pet owner -- easy to consult, if you need a refresher
i like that one!
cool - clients will appreciate it, thank U kindly.

- terry

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