Best way to deal with fluid retention in dog with high white blood cell count?

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Best way to deal with fluid retention in dog with high white blood cell count?

This is a discussion on Best way to deal with fluid retention in dog with high white blood cell count? within the Dog Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Some background: Species: Dog Age: 9 Sex/Neuter status: Male/Intact Breed: Boxer Body weight: 80 lbs Clinical signs: Lethargy, some diarrhea My 9 year old boxer ...

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Old 05-10-2018, 08:24 PM
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Best way to deal with fluid retention in dog with high white blood cell count?

Some background:

Species: Dog

Age: 9

Sex/Neuter status: Male/Intact

Breed: Boxer

Body weight: 80 lbs

Clinical signs: Lethargy, some diarrhea



My 9 year old boxer was on Desmopressin for almost a year (we stopped giving it to him about 2 weeks ago) after being diagnosed with Diabetes Insipidus. He did really well on the medicine, but now he has pretty significant fluid retention of the abdomen. We brought him to our vet about 3 weeks ago and had a blood test done. His white blood cell count was at 51. The vet gave him antibiotics and Lasix, and after almost a week on the antibiotics his white blood cell was up to 57.

The Lasix tablets (a diuretic) helped a bit, but he is still pretty swollen, which is giving him problems walking. The vet also prescribed a steroid, Prednisone, after the white blood cell count went up. The fluid sample from his abdomen signified that he might have lymphoma, but it may also just be an infection. He is taking 3 antibiotics a day, half a tablet two times a day of Prednisone (as we are nearing the end of his second week on Prednisone), and he now is getting a large dose by shot of a diuretic every other day.

Our current focus is getting out all of the fluid he has retained so we can treat the underlying cause, but it's not being released at the rate we need. This Saturday we are going back to the vet and he's going to drain the fluid with a syringe. The vet said he doesn't perform this procedure unless it's really necessary because sometimes dogs go into shock from this and don't make it.

Does anyone have a similar experience or some input on the matter? Thanks so much in advance for any advice you can give.
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