Advice re: preventing dog licking paw pads?

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Advice re: preventing dog licking paw pads?

This is a discussion on Advice re: preventing dog licking paw pads? within the Dog Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Greetings, My wife and I have had our nearly 2 yr old Aussie for about 10 months now, and thrice in that time, he has ...

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Old 09-23-2017, 02:31 PM
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Advice re: preventing dog licking paw pads?

Greetings,

My wife and I have had our nearly 2 yr old Aussie for about 10 months now, and thrice in that time, he has gotten some kind of mystery injury on a paw...nothing obvious, and fortunately nothing serious...that he then worries over and obsessively licks to the point where he either removes hair from his paw, or turns his paw pads pink and sensitive (as if he licked off the black coloring).

It has not been the same paw each time. He may have a splinter or something in his pad at present, but we can't see or feel anything, and the fact that this has happened three times in such a short time suggests to me that he has particularly sensitive feet. We live in a rural area, and he is always running around in the wilderness, so some periodic mild pad abrasions and irritation is unavoidable.

We have tried wrapping the foot up with a sock and that stretchy adhesive tape for dogs, but he just fusses until he gets the sock off. Next I am going to try taping the foot directly...skipping the sock...but I know my dog and he won't like that either. None of the bitter-tasting sprays work on my dog at all; I tried a product called "Bitter Yuck" and not only did it not deter the licking...I think in fact he liked the taste!

So, just casting my bread upon the waters here, to see if anyone has had any similar experiences and can share any strategies or words of wisdom.

Thanks in advance!

Chuck
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Old 09-23-2017, 03:43 PM
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Has he seen a vet? My experience is that vets can often see or feel things we can't.

Do you live in an area where tick-borne diseases are possible? One symptom is pain in varying joints which often manifests as limping or favoring on leg or paw, but licking is also a reaction to pain.
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Old 09-23-2017, 08:06 PM
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Smile Vet, vet, vet...

always the 1st option, see the med-pro.

Are GRASS AWNS endemic where U live?
Is it sandy / beach scrub? - SAND SPURS are ferocious, & can leave multiple barbs buried beneath the skin.
BURDOCK is another nasty hooked seed-pod that can be embedded.

All 3 can require magnification, a scalpel, & tweezers to be removed. Very painful, can leave draining sores, too, once out.

Do U use lawn-care products? --
WEED N'FEED can cause terrible irritation & surface burns, plus it passes thru skin into the bloodstream - nasty toxic stuff.
If U use lawn-care synthetic fertilizer, I would suggest 2 things:
- switch to natural fertilizers;
sterilized organic cow-manure is excellent; slow release, stays in place , vs running off with the 1st rain to "fertilize" nearby ponds, streams, etc as synthos do.

- cut the lawn TALLER.
3-inches minimum, 4-inches preferably. // Grass grows like a tiny tree; stem, branch, stem, branch, etc. The shorter it's cut, the fewer BRANCHES it has to produce food; stem can't get enuf sun exposure to generate food, & besides the lower stem is creamy yellow 'cuz it lacks chlorophyll.
Golf courses are often forced to spray-paint their putting areas "green" - they're so scalped, there's no branch left.
The more branches U leave on, the more lush the growth & healthier the lawn. Plus, a thick tall lawn forces the broadleaves up in the air - they want to be horizontal, so short, stubby lawns are a gift to broadleaves.

The soil-surface under 3-inch tall grass can be 15'F cooler than the lawn surface, from the shade cast by the grass. This drought-proofs the lawn, & helps retain moisture - which otherwise evaporates.

Note that to be able to raise a typical household-mower 4" above the soil, U may need to replace the wheels with taller wheels, on the same axles - but the savings on lawn care & re-seeding are well-worth the investment.

- terry

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Old 09-23-2017, 08:19 PM
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Lightbulb 3rd suggestion...

Since this will apparently be a continuing saga, i'd invest in some good booties & use them faithfully.

Protecting the dog's feet from the whatever will save a lot of angst on Ur side, & pain for the dog - also, vet-fees.
U will need to habituate the booties - here's an example of How-To:


Looking at it
Take a step toward it
sniff in its direction
sniff in close contact
touch
etc, etc, ... are all MARKED & REWARDED; every interaction, however tentative, means a Good Thing for the dog.
Don't be cheap, this is not a kibble event; pea-sized or even half-pea, but high value tidbits.

cubed lean beef, diced chkn or turkey breast, freeze-dried bf liver or lamb-lung, etc, etc.

- terry


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Old 09-23-2017, 11:43 PM
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Its possible that the dog has some allergies, or might be encountering something like poison ivy, which causes an allergic reaction.

This is a pretty good summary:

Compulsive Licking, Biting, and Scratching in Dogs

And so is this, although I have reservations about it because it recommends a specific product:
https://dermapaw.com/blogs/dog-paw-licking
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Old 09-25-2017, 11:13 PM
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Hola Gang!

There are no lawns or lawn products within miles of where we live.

My dog has switched from licking his pads to incessantly licking between a couple of his toes on his right front paw, so it seems to me this is not a case of a splinter in a pad, but just a 'hot spot' scenario.

No over-the-counter anti-hot-spot potions work at all. I need a new 'solution-oriented' vet in my area. What I mean is "I pay them money, and they provide a solution." My current vet center is great at getting paid, but not too good at providing a solution. I can tell you with 100% certainty, that if I took my dog into this soon-to-be-former vet center, they would poorly shave all his paws, traumatizing him in the process, and yet they would spectacularly fail to solve the problem they are charging me to fix. Been down that path already.

So...new vet. Does anyone have any recommendations for a solution-oriented vet in my area? I live is Santa Barbara County, California, USA.

Thanks,

Otherchuck
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Old 09-26-2017, 07:59 AM
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I've had good luck with treating small skin lesions with Neosporin cream (not the ointment). It contains an analgesic that reduces any discomfort on the site, which reduces the dogs' interest in it.
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