$700 Tab For A Normal De-Scaling

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$700 Tab For A Normal De-Scaling

This is a discussion on $700 Tab For A Normal De-Scaling within the Dog Health forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Anyone has any good recommendation for vet in the east. Recently my dog did a normal de-scaling at Animal Practice Vet Clinic, 1015 Upper Serangoon ...

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Old 07-02-2017, 06:11 AM
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Thumbs down $700 Tab For A Normal De-Scaling

Anyone has any good recommendation for vet in the east. Recently my dog did a normal de-scaling at Animal Practice Vet Clinic, 1015 Upper Serangoon Road, i got charged for almost $700. Ridiculous.
Thanks..
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Old 07-02-2017, 01:06 PM
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I have a suggestion. Let your dog work on an appropriate raw bone and you'll never need to have your dog put under or spend $700.
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Old 07-02-2017, 08:40 PM
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$700.00 seems a little high, even for Southern California standards, and pretty much everything is high here. My experience is, we had Samantha's teeth cleaned when she was three years old, and it was, as I recall around $350.00. She is now eight years old, so my info is not absolutely current. Since the last cleaning, I have brushed her teeth daily, using a child's toothbrush, and canine enzyme toothpaste. Vet checks her teeth and says, they need no intervention, they are good. I am a real believer in that daily brushing routine.
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Old 07-02-2017, 11:08 PM
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Good grief... My vet only charges about $100 for teeth cleaning and if any teeth need pulled about $10 a tooth.

Stormy
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Old 07-03-2017, 09:55 AM
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May i know what bones are you feeding your dog? which part? some bones are too hard. Thanks.
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Old 07-03-2017, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by BaileysMT View Post
May i know what bones are you feeding your dog? which part? some bones are too hard. Thanks.
I generally use turkey and chicken backs/necks as well as longer portions of cow tails. Beef and pork neck bones are fairly convoluted so they work well also.

One needs to discover how aggressive and thorough a chewer their dog is and proceed accordingly. Chewing, crunching and grinding the bones is preferred rather than the dog swallowing large pieces without crunching and grinding them first.

Two basics are ; always raw and for edible bones intended to be crunched and ingested by the dog, make sure they are not weight bearing bones such as femur bones.

My dog ( GSD ) easily can eat chicken quarters and swallows fairly large pieces after she crunches and breaks the bones so the dental benefit is not as pronounced as given her a 12-18 inch section of meaty cow's tail which she really has to work on as she tears and grinds much more than poultry bones.

As you are currently doing, I would research the topic in depth and monitor your dog if you decide to allow your dog appropriate raw bones. I think you will be impressed at the dental benefit.
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Old 07-13-2017, 09:39 AM
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Originally Posted by DriveDog View Post
I have a suggestion. Let your dog work on an appropriate raw bone and you'll never need to have your dog put under or spend $700.
I am asking what kind of bone, too.... I have used chicken necks and backs before - but, at the pet store. I'd prefer to buy from a butcher - more natural and I just feel better about it - but the local one usually just wants to give me a carcass. I prefer they cut it up and just give me what I need/want. But, will they do that? I don't think they are interested. Should I offer to pay more? How do you get yours?

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Originally Posted by BaileysMT View Post
Anyone has any good recommendation for vet in the east. Recently my dog did a normal de-scaling at Animal Practice Vet Clinic, 1015 Upper Serangoon Road, i got charged for almost $700. Ridiculous.
Thanks..
You should try living in Canada.... it's way more at some vet's. It is probably a lot because of where you are?

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Originally Posted by BaileysMT View Post
May i know what bones are you feeding your dog? which part? some bones are too hard. Thanks.
I think the chicken necks and backs are the ones most recommended, especially for smaller dogs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DriveDog View Post
I generally use turkey and chicken backs/necks as well as longer portions of cow tails. Beef and pork neck bones are fairly convoluted so they work well also.

One needs to discover how aggressive and thorough a chewer their dog is and proceed accordingly. Chewing, crunching and grinding the bones is preferred rather than the dog swallowing large pieces without crunching and grinding them first.

Two basics are ; always raw and for edible bones intended to be crunched and ingested by the dog, make sure they are not weight bearing bones such as femur bones.

My dog ( GSD ) easily can eat chicken quarters and swallows fairly large pieces after she crunches and breaks the bones so the dental benefit is not as pronounced as given her a 12-18 inch section of meaty cow's tail which she really has to work on as she tears and grinds much more than poultry bones.

As you are currently doing, I would research the topic in depth and monitor your dog if you decide to allow your dog appropriate raw bones. I think you will be impressed at the dental benefit.
Is a cow tail appropriate for a smaller dog? What if your dog isn't an avid chewer? Well, mine is....but, when treats are involved (for e.g., liver treats), she just wants to gobble them down. But, when I take her to my friend's place who has a dog....and a lot of toys...she will grab certain toys and really chew them apart. I think some of them are kongs, tennis balls and 'dolls' - I prefer she take the kongs so I usually take the other ones away when she looks like she's gonnna tear them apart.

I would like to get a raw bone she could chew if I knew she would chew it and I would like to find a butcher that would just offer the chicken back and/or neck (and not the entire carcass) but maybe that's what most do - give you the entire carcass?

Good topic, thanks, all.

Btw, in Canada, dental work for dogs are really expensive - possibly in the thousands of dollars....a few Canadians drive down to the U.S. to get dental work.... not an option for me, though.
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