Hypoallergenic Breeds

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Hypoallergenic Breeds

This is a discussion on Hypoallergenic Breeds within the Dog Breeds forums, part of the Other Dogforum Interests category; So i would love to get a dog soon but most of my family is allergic and i would love to take the dog for ...

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Old 08-18-2017, 08:06 PM
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Hypoallergenic Breeds

So i would love to get a dog soon but most of my family is allergic and i would love to take the dog for visits and such but not if its going to cause a massive attack. The breed im looking at is a Basenji which i have always liked but what other breeds would be good im not looking at Toys/Teacups/Poodles but open to terriers i just really dont want a tiny dog i like bigger ones
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Old 08-18-2017, 08:37 PM
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Unhappy sadly, these are an invention of breeders who want to make sales...

... AND charge more money for 'hypoallergenic' dogs.

Most ppl react to the dander on a dog, or the actual microdebris caught in the dog's coat: pollens, auto-exhaust, mold spores, diesel particulates, plain old dirt, etc.

Frequent baths interspersed with rinses to remove pollen in heavy-pollen periods, & also WIPING THE DOG'S PAWS as they enter the house, can all help.
that's why "hypoallergenic" breeds are AKA 'mandatory grooming' - Schnauzer, Airedale, Poodle, Maltese, any curly, wire, wavy, or single-coat / indeterminate length. // Do the same thing with any breed - bathe them, anything from monthly to weekly, with a gentle pH balanced NON-flea-killing! ordinary shampoo, one that's not perfumed, colored, etc.

Flea shampoos are harsh on hair & skin, & are also -toxic-. // Any shampoo left on the dog for 5 to 10-mins will drown fleas; be sure to soap the neck thoroughly, so the fleas don't get to 'high ground' [the head] & jump off into the room. Lather the neck heavily 1st, then wash the body & legs, & finally wash the dog's head & face carefully with a washcloth, to drown them there, too.

Keep the dog -Out- of the sufferer's bedroom at all times; keep the dog closed, & close that room's vent.
Provide a separate AC window-unit [not the whole-house central AC via the vent], & their own small, high-efficiency heater for winter.

Use HEPA filters on the whole-house air return, before it gets to the vent system; TAPE IT to the frame, so that all the air goes ==> thru the filter, not _--_--_-- around --_ --_ the filter. No leaks.
Change the filter every 90-days / 3-mos; 3M's Ultrete is a fantastic filter; it won't make the system work harder by reducing air-flow, & it DOES catch itty-bitty stuff, including some viruses.

Clean the vents - hire a professional company that preferably uses steam, not chemicals, to clean the vents out thoroughly.
U can also use disposable vent-filters on every vent in the house, to catch the junk that would be blown out into the rooms, before it's exhaled. // These also need to be changed when they look dirty - turn OFF the system before removing the cover, carefully remove the cover, & bag the filter gently so that the junk isn't flung to the floor, airborne, etc.


BAG THE SUFFERER'S MATTRESS & PILLOWS -
mite-proof / dust-proof / bedbug-proof zippered covers are a Godsend; wrap everything, & be sure to wash all bedding [blankets, duvet, etc] at least every 3 to 4 weeks, & sheets / pillowcases weekly, with a "free" laundry soap [no coloring, perfumes, softeners, etc - plain, simple detergent; no phosphate].


Method makes a good environmentally-safe line of cleaners - they are low-odor & very safe. TARGET carries the whole line, including their dishwashing tablets - the only machine-dishwashing product that does NOT cause respiratory irritation.
[my then-client was a quadraplegic with breathing concerns; no liquid or tablet or 'pouch' dish-detergent was safe for him, except Method's tabs. ]

TAKE OFF SHOES when entering the house!
wear shoes / slippers that U only wear indoors; leave all the microdebris in the foyer.

Deep-clean the carpets & send the rugs out annually or every 6-mos for pro cleaning.

Hope this helps,
- terry



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Old 08-18-2017, 09:24 PM
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Thanks for the reply i never knew that i know most breeds are the ones with hair not fur that are said to be hypoallergenic
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Old 08-18-2017, 10:22 PM
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Talking what's the difference?

Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowsspy View Post

... most breeds ... with hair, not fur, ... are said to be "hypoallergenic" .
OK - how do U tell "hair" from "fur"? I'm genuinely asking -
aside from "long hair" / indeterminate length, what the heck do they define as 'hair' vs 'fur'?

It's all hooey, anyway; any mandatory-grooming breed is "less" provoking, but if they react to dander, they WILL react to saliva - so if a friendly dog licks them as an affectionate gesture, they're gonna have a weal / rash / whatever.

It's not as simple as "Haired" dogs are safe, "Furred" dogs [whatever the heck that is] are not. // I wish it were, in a way; no such luck.

- terry


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Old 08-18-2017, 11:43 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leashedForLife View Post
OK - how do U tell "hair" from "fur"? I'm genuinely asking -
aside from "long hair" / indeterminate length, what the heck do they define as 'hair' vs 'fur'?

It's all hooey, anyway; any mandatory-grooming breed is "less" provoking, but if they react to dander, they WILL react to saliva - so if a friendly dog licks them as an affectionate gesture, they're gonna have a weal / rash / whatever.

It's not as simple as "Haired" dogs are safe, "Furred" dogs [whatever the heck that is] are not. // I wish it were, in a way; no such luck.

- terry

Generally I think people bring up a shih zu as hair vs fur as compared to say a lab the fur feels lighter and less like fur if that makes sense in a shih zu
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Old 08-19-2017, 07:22 AM
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Red face it's really just marketing.

There are *some* dogs whose saliva & dander have been tested for certain allergens, & they are less-likely to provoke an allergic reaction in folks who react to those specific allergens - but they aren't fool-proof, any person can be allergic to anything, & what provokes a strong reaction in one person is perfectly fine for someone else.
Allergies are very complex.
===================

if i described a dog as "furry", i'd think double-coated - a Sammy, Husky, Collie, even a long-haired GSD.

if i called a dog "hairy", i'd more-likely think of a wire-coated breed with longer wisps protruding from the base coat - like Schnauzers, Griffons, etc.

OTOH, if asked about a dog who has "hair like a human", i'd be more-likely to say an Afghan, Maltese, Lhasa, or similar indeterminate-length coats.

================

there are proteins in dog-saliva & dog-dander [dander is skin cells] that can provoke allergic reactions in some ppl; this means that some breeds are more-likely to bother ppl with specific allergies than others.
Unfortunately, allergies are so individualistic that only cautious exposure can let U know which dogs really bother U, & which don't - it's rarely as simple & straightforward as certain breeds are OK, & others are not.

but any dog, of virtually any breed, can often be made much-less allergy-provoking by treating them like a mandatory-grooming breed:
bathe the dog often, rinse in-between when pollen or other allergens are heavy, etc.

Keeping the house cleaner also helps:
brush or comb the dog OUTDOORS not in-, wipe their paws before allowing them into the house, keep them out of the sufferer's room, & so on.

Simply not letting the dog up on furniture is a help - or allow the dog up only on a dust-proof slip-covered sofa, & wash that slip-cover weekly, just as if it was the sheet on a bed.

It's all about not accumulating allergens. // Cleaning the vents is often a huge help; microdebris from previous tenants will linger for decades!

Cats glaze every hair on their bodies with a thin coat of saliva as they groom, which dries into a thin varnish, cracks, & flakes into the air. This stuff is so fine & light that it floats on every air-current & sifts onto walls, & even ceilings; 30-years after any cat once lived in a particular apartment or house, there will STILL be allergenic particles present -
on walls that haven't been re-painted, in carpets or the rug-padding beneath that they didn't replace when they ripped out the old carpet, on ceilings, in the vents, in cracks between floorboards, under the shelf-liners in kitchen cabinets... anywhere, everywhere.

HEPA filters on air-returns are amazingly effective; when we used them in our Va Beach apt, the furniture was suddenly dust-free, & after almost 2-years of HEPA filters changed regularly, smoke-like dark 'plumes' began to show on the white popcorn ceilings around the vents: the many, many years of accumulated gunk in the ducts was gradually being blown out by the now-clean, filtered air.

My mother wouldn't agree to spend the $$ to get the obviously-filthy ducts cleaned, so i used cheap disposable vent-filters -- thin sheets that looked like dryer-sheets for fabric softening - under the louvered vents.
They worked better than nothing; the out-plumes on those hideous popcorn ceilings continued to darken slowly, but the vent-filters did catch the larger particles.
Vent-filter sheets are not HEPA, tho - they'll only sieve out the big stuff, hair, larger dust particles, & so on.

- terry

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