How do you feel about neutering? - Page 4

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How do you feel about neutering?

This is a discussion on How do you feel about neutering? within the Working Dogs forums, part of the Dog Shows and Performance category; Ugh we've tossed this around the dinner table a few times even though its pretty far in the future and its a gut wrencher. On ...

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Old 10-19-2015, 09:27 PM
  #31
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Ugh we've tossed this around the dinner table a few times even though its pretty far in the future and its a gut wrencher.

On one hand Leia is turning out incredibly good looking and it almost seems like we should. Filas, like other 'exotic' breeds have suffered brutally in the last couple decades from poor breeding and, not to brag, but compared to other puppies she just looks so much truer. Her breeder has been following her through our face books and has hinted at the idea and even offered to help us pick a stud and to coach us through the process. Aaaannnd, I wouldn't at all mind another puppy in a few years (she's not even 1, if we did it it'd probably be at 3 or 4 years old).

On the other hand I don't really want to deal with pregnancy. I hate the thought of the health risks to her.

In the middle is the whole financial aspect. Her breeder said a stud fee might be around USD 2000. Vet care. Sweat equity on our parts. Puppies could go for about 2.5-3 each. Litters could be up to 10 but average 6 and the breed has a lot of still births and Leia was only one of 4. A puppy with defects would have to be adopted out (although I'm starting to fear that the thing nobody is talking about is euthanasia). It could make a little money and give us a new puppy or it could run a loss and our baby could die in labor.

Thankfully in our case it's 2 years out so it's just chatter at the moment, but I can certainly understand why some would agonize over the decision. It certainly would be an easier one if the dog in question was a male.

We talk about breeding Simba sometimes since he's beautiful and a stellar example of a lab, but he doesn't have papers and the world is swimming in Labs so in the end he's fated to loose his balls in a couple months.

Last edited by Esand; 10-19-2015 at 09:30 PM.
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Old 10-19-2015, 11:59 PM
  #32
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My girl has been fixed, and ill admit that the reason was 95% because of selfishness. I dont want to have to deal with the mess of heat cycles, and although Im confident I can keep my girl secured in my yard, I am less certain about stopping males getting in to my yard if her being in heat is tempting enough, especially as there are a lot of roaming dogs in my area.

However I also cant imagine that going through heat cycles and potential phantom pregnancies would be a fun thing for my dog either...

I am firmly on the side of neutering when it comes to shelter pets and the majority of mixed breed dogs. I'm sure that there are responsible people out there who would easily be able to deal with intact pets, and not have any oops litters, however I think that it is too much responsibility for the average person to deal with.

When it comes to working dogs, I understand that people may need to wait a few years to see if the dog develops into a good example of the breed, with good working abilities. If this is done carefully to avoid any litters before the decision to breed has been made, I see no problem with this.
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Old 10-25-2015, 09:33 PM
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If you're not breeding, then neuter / spay the dogs as soon as possible. Aside from the risk of potential unwanted pregnancy - or getting into dog fights [bitch in heat, aggressive males] - it is really just common sense.

All of our non breeding animals - 5 Border collies, 21 barn cats, are spayed and neutered.

I mean I'll never forget five years ago when my brother rescued a puppy mill mother from the pound - he pretty much took her as he was volunteering and it was either that or she'd be put down right then and there. Aside from the mental damage done to the dog she ended up with cancer all throughout her ovaries and uterus due to overbreeding - a common trait of puppy mill dogs. Lovely dog and we made sure she knew she was loved for those last few months but it was a definite loosing battle. I hate to have imagined what her life would have been like if the puppy mill hadn't been busted.
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Old 10-26-2015, 03:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reflex View Post
If you're not breeding, then neuter / spay the dogs as soon as possible. Aside from the risk of potential unwanted pregnancy - or getting into dog fights [bitch in heat, aggressive males] - it is really just common sense.

All of our non breeding animals - 5 Border collies, 21 barn cats, are spayed and neutered.

I mean I'll never forget five years ago when my brother rescued a puppy mill mother from the pound - he pretty much took her as he was volunteering and it was either that or she'd be put down right then and there. Aside from the mental damage done to the dog she ended up with cancer all throughout her ovaries and uterus due to overbreeding - a common trait of puppy mill dogs. Lovely dog and we made sure she knew she was loved for those last few months but it was a definite loosing battle. I hate to have imagined what her life would have been like if the puppy mill hadn't been busted.
I wouldn't say "as soon as possible". It's actually more ideal to delay spay/neuter at least until after maturity, if at all possible. There are also alternatives, like doing an ovary sparing spay, or vasectomy, that will sterilize a dog while still letting it keep it's hormones. Hormones are important to development. Studies show that dogs spayed/neutered prior to maturity are more likely to experience certain injuries, get certain types of very dangerous and aggressive cancers, and have joint issues. Hormones also play a role in mood stabilization in female dogs. Unspayed females are less likely to have issues with "bitch aggression".

Obviously there are situations where delaying isn't ideal, and where it's best to get it done ASAP. Like if somebody is unable to responsibly handle an intact dog until after maturity. But if somebody is able, I will always recommend waiting until at least 1 year, ideally longer. Especially for sport/working dogs and giant breeds.
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Old 10-26-2015, 10:30 AM
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Originally Posted by Reflex View Post
If you're not breeding, then neuter / spay the dogs as soon as possible. Aside from the risk of potential unwanted pregnancy - or getting into dog fights [bitch in heat, aggressive males] - it is really just common sense.

All of our non breeding animals - 5 Border collies, 21 barn cats, are spayed and neutered.

I mean I'll never forget five years ago when my brother rescued a puppy mill mother from the pound - he pretty much took her as he was volunteering and it was either that or she'd be put down right then and there. Aside from the mental damage done to the dog she ended up with cancer all throughout her ovaries and uterus due to overbreeding - a common trait of puppy mill dogs. Lovely dog and we made sure she knew she was loved for those last few months but it was a definite loosing battle. I hate to have imagined what her life would have been like if the puppy mill hadn't been busted.
Actually, it's less common sense than many people would lead to believe. From simply a preventing pregnancy point of view, yes, spay/neuter ASAP is common sense. However, from the dog's health point of view it is nowhere near that cut and dry. There are a number of health reasons why folks may choose to wait on neutering, or opt out of it entirely. When you take those potential health risks into account "neuter ASAP" doesn't really stand as the common sense answer.

Note- I'm not saying that people are wrong to neuter their pets, even at an early age. Not everyone is up to the responsibility of managing an intact animal. Just that each owner needs to evaluate the risks of leaving it intact (for life, or until maturity) with the potential health benefits of leaving intact.
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