When is a dog an adult?

Go Back   Dog Forum > Keeping and Caring for Dogs > General Dog Discussion

When is a dog an adult?

This is a discussion on When is a dog an adult? within the General Dog Discussion forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; So someone else told me that small dogs mature faster than large dogs. At what age is a dog no longer a puppy & why ...

User Tag List

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-18-2010, 05:58 AM
  #1
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
When is a dog an adult?

So someone else told me that small dogs mature faster than large dogs.

At what age is a dog no longer a puppy & why do small dogs mature faster?

Thanks


Michelle
sensualspirit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 08:06 AM
  #2
Senior Member
 
Tulip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,088
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Small dogs mature faster because they're smaller. That said, I own two small dogs, and my boy didn't mature fully until he was about a year and a half. My girl is 11 months and she's still a puppy in many many ways. So I guess it depends on the dog really, but in general, a small dog will reach adulthood mentally at about a year and a half or so, and a larger one, at least two years old.

Welcome to the forum, too, why don't you start an intro thread? You'll get a lot more responses to your threads if people know who you are.
Tulip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 08:58 AM
  #3
Senior Member
 
Tess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 13,303
Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
It also depends on the breed itself. Some mature faster than others. In general, large breeds are not totally mature until 2 to 3 years. There is physical maturity that happens a somewhat before "social maturity."

If you love the puppy and teenage stages, there is no hurry to reach maturity! ;-)
Tess is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 09:00 AM
  #4
Senior Member
 
Sarah W's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Wales, UK
Posts: 1,288
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I was wondering the same myself. How do you know when they've reached maturity (other than age)?
Sarah W is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 10:19 AM
  #5
Senior Member
 
Tulip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,088
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
I found that it just came to me one day whilst chatting about him to a friend...I realised he no longer needed his walk to behave anymore, though obviously I still walk him. He's turned into a right old man and he's only two! Sleeps a lot more, is very well-behaved and responds well to me and my family in every way. He's basically the perfect dog now - there's no more chewing, no more barking, no more jumping up, and all in all he's far calmer. I guess I just knew he was! Now I have another teenager and she's getting there, but she still chews a bit, still needs a walk to settle down at night, and in general is very puppyish in herself.
Tulip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 12:23 PM
  #6
Senior Member
 
Criosphynx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Som'where between Utopia and Insomnia.
Posts: 11,482
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
my 15lb mutt matured at about 18 months. I saw a dip in reactivity (over the top reactions to things, calmer in stressful situations) and a small dip in activity...which until this point, had been building.

the growth tho, became unnoticeable at about 10-12 months. Iam sure he filled out more, but not much
Criosphynx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 05:01 PM
  #7
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Thanks.

Still not understanding why a small dog would mature faster just b/c it's smaller in size & brain.


Michelle
sensualspirit is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 05:14 PM
  #8
Senior Member
 
Tulip's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 1,088
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Less growing to do. Less hormones rushing around because there's less space for them to do it. The bigger dog you get, the longer it will take to become an adult.

Why don't you go to a shelter, where there's one that's already mature and adult?
Tulip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 05:45 PM
  #9
Senior Member
 
Criosphynx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Som'where between Utopia and Insomnia.
Posts: 11,482
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by sensualspirit View Post
Thanks.

Still not understanding why a small dog would mature faster just b/c it's smaller in size & brain.


Michelle

I know it seems silly, but I can vouch for it being truth. Tulip hit the nail on the head...it has to do with hormone levels and growth.
Criosphynx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-18-2010, 05:56 PM
  #10
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 68
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Ahh, I understand now Thanks

I'm not discounting a shelter, would just have to save up.

Thanks


Michelle
sensualspirit is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Helping an adult dog adjust to me Bentfish New Additions 7 10-13-2010 03:27 PM
Adult dog pooping and peeing everywhere... help! lupino Dog Training and Behavior 4 09-24-2010 07:09 AM
crate training adult dog TegansMyBoy Dog Training and Behavior 16 09-21-2010 12:08 AM
adult dog cannot keep and pee like a puppy MattTS Dog Training and Behavior 4 06-22-2010 12:08 AM
New puppy & adult dog Luv2byte Puppy Help 2 09-20-2009 03:49 AM


Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. Runs best on HiVelocity Hosting.