Is my dog getting the proper nutrients in his homemade dog food?!

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Is my dog getting the proper nutrients in his homemade dog food?!

This is a discussion on Is my dog getting the proper nutrients in his homemade dog food?! within the Dog Food forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Hello, I have a 48lb, border collie/pit. Since adopting him almost exactly a year ago, there have been countless health concerns that have surfaced ie ...

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Old 07-22-2012, 04:04 PM
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Is my dog getting the proper nutrients in his homemade dog food?!

Hello,

I have a 48lb, border collie/pit. Since adopting him almost exactly a year ago, there have been countless health concerns that have surfaced ie gas, wont eat certain foods, filmy bowls, constant scratching of face and ears, constant licking of paws (which we think led to a skin irritation to the paws, ive recently noticed a scabbing between his back left paw) etc. Beyond that im completely over paranoid i bring him to the vet every time a new concern surfaces, and what they've concluded is that he has bad food allergies. which lead to me making a homemade food diet.

so my first question is, 1. do these issues sounds like they truly are food allergies? and 2. Is my dog getting the proper nutrition in the homemade food im making him.

HOMEMADE FOOD RECIPE:
I estimated it as 30 oz of food per day...
(first serving in morning and second in the evening)

1/2 cup of steamed/finely chopped organic carrots
1/2 cup steamed/finely chopped organic kale or peas
2 cups meat (all the meat is steroid/hormone free and ranges from ground turkey/chicken/sirloin 93%lean, chicken breast, and bison burgers...)
1 cup brown rice
1 tbsp fish oil (right now he gets one capsule of "Aller G-3, which the vet prescribed)

My big concern is that the portions are not large enough, I get nervous thinking he is still hungry!! Also, another huge concern is the lack of calcium. the vet recommenced a hard boiled egg ground up (shell and all, which took me by surprise) once a week.

All suggestions and comments (both neg and pos) are greatly appreciated, i just want to make sure my little boy is getting the correct amount of servings, vitamins etc.

Thanks so much!!
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:34 PM
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Eggshells are a great source of calcium, and eggs are a good source of a variety of vitamins and a selection of odds and ends nutrients.

Is this the recipe the vet gave you? Did you go through a nutritnist at all? What did the vet say he's allergic too and how did they determine what that was?
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:52 PM
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hmm. sounds like a good recipe.

My dog has the exact same problems as what you have mentioned while on commerical food, which is why I decided to switch her to raw.
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Old 07-22-2012, 04:57 PM
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The vet gave me a ratio for meat to veggies to grains, along with what veggies and meat selections to choose from.. but not an exact amount for his weight size.

Also, now that you mention it, both vets did not tell me exactly what he was allergic to... they just said that due to his symptoms its most likely the food, so he was put on gastro intestinal (low fat, Royal Canine brand). Tho his gas did lighten up, it was still present. So i suggested the homemade diet to the vet, which his primary vet said yes to and his secondary (a family vet my parents use for their dog that i go to on occasion if im home and ahve an emergency) said not to bc she was concerend he wouldnt get proper nutrition....
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Old 07-22-2012, 05:33 PM
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Well, its probly not a bad idea to ask your vet about a vet nutritionist, the nutriotionist doesn't have to be local, but they'll want copies of his full medical records. That way you can be sure he's getting exactly what he needs. However most vets offices I've dealt with do keep a selection of basic reciepes on hand for this sort of case.

Having said that a few weeks on the diet given may do wonders to soothe his system and you're not likely to cause HUGE deficianies in that time span. I'm not a nutritionist, I know eggs will do alot but I don't know the figures for the veggis, so I can't comment from there.

Amount to feed isn't that hard to figure out. Assuming he's at a reasonable weight now, start out with what you list here, in a week or two weigh him (most vets offices don't mind folks slipping in to get a weight), if his weight has changed add or decrease the amount a bit and repeat weighing in a couple weeks.

I will say that the symptoms you describe do appear to indicate a possible allergy, but I'm less than thrilled with the lack of diagnosis (did the vet offer any tests or food trials or no?).

I'm going to suggest picking ONE meat source (beef OR chicken OR turkey). And use only that for several weeks. If the issues clear up, then you can try a new meat source, if they DON'T clear up then that meat maybe one of the allergins, repeat with something different. This includes treats and rawhides. No beef treats if you've picked turkey (for example). I'm also going to suggest NOT using chicken as the orginal meat source, chicken is a fairly common allergen.
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Old 07-22-2012, 08:20 PM
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American College of Veterinary Nutrition

To help you find a nutritionist.
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Old 07-22-2012, 09:46 PM
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If you think he has allergies I wouldn't be giving him so many protein sources...if he's allergic to some you're bound to be giving it to him with so many. Also what about organ meat?
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Old 07-22-2012, 11:31 PM
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I also cook for my dog and the ratio i use is 75% meat to 25% ground up veggies. Peas and carrots are both high glycemic vegetables, meaning they are high in sugar so i pretty much stick to low glycemic vegetables, a few of them are green beans, yellow squash, cauliflower and brussels sprouts. The veggies mostly are used for fiber. Veggies can be steamed or ground up really small in a food processor

I do not use grains at all, too many problems associated with them. If you do wish to use them, I would not make them any more than 1/6th of the diet. Many dogs are allergic to grains

I would stick with just one meat, alternating all meat, beef, pork, turkey, chicken and i think you mentioned a couple more that you were feeding ... add your veggie, also add some organ meat which would be beef kidney or beef liver. Add about 1 ounce.
Muscle meat should also be one of your meats that you will alternate and that would be beef heart. Once you know a certain vegetable is well tolerated, you could give him more than one veggie, my guy gets around 3 or 4 mixed in with his meat

canned mackerel and canned salmon can also be fed.

calcium has to be added. It is essential! It is 1/2 teaspoon per lb of food. It should be added right before the food is served, it should not be frozen. You can purchase egg shell calcium .. it is called eggshellent calcium. Fish oil is also added right before food is served
Here's to Healthy Pets - Pet's FriendsEggShellent Calcium

if you were to feed salmon or mackerel, you do not add calcium or fish oil to them. Salmon and Mackerel have bones in them for the calcium. They are steamed bones and are very soft so you do not have to worry about your dog eating them. Plus there is oil in the fish so that is why you do not have to add any extra salmon oil

you could also give him a hardboiled egg in his food 3 times a week. Yogurt and cottage cheese are also good for him to have. You could put a little cottage cheese on his food or a little yogurt. My dog gets a little yogurt every night as a snack . Monitor every ingredient that is given to make sure there are no problems

i think i would start off using one meat and one veggie to see how well that was tolerated

it sounds to me like a lot of food he is eating, i would watch his weight to see if he is gaining too much. I have a male labrador retriever that weighs 89 lbs and he doesnt get anything near what you are feeding your boy

I make up quite a bit of food, put it into zip lock bags and freeze it.
Good luck with everything
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