Dry food for a dog with crystals.

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Dry food for a dog with crystals.

This is a discussion on Dry food for a dog with crystals. within the Dog Food forums, part of the Keeping and Caring for Dogs category; Poor Willow has calcium crystals in her urine. They want to put her on a prescription diet ( royal canin). I really hate putting her ...

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Old 11-26-2011, 08:10 AM
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Dry food for a dog with crystals.

Poor Willow has calcium crystals in her urine. They want to put her on a prescription diet ( royal canin). I really hate putting her on this food since there is a lot of corn , by products and it's not a puppy based food. Does anyone know of a food I can feed her besides the prescription diet? The vet said if I can find another food that is lower in calcium I can use that instead. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
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Old 11-26-2011, 12:21 PM
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They are Calcium Oxalates?

Feeding a protein and sodium-restricted, as well as minor calcium-restricted, alkalinizing diet may prevent the formation of oxalate stones. Potassium citrate may be given to help achieve a neutral or slightly alkaline urine. (A product called Urocit-K that your vet could get for you). Protein restriction will be tough in puppy foods so it may be worth asking about the Urocit-K and sticking with puppy food until she is fully grown.

The Royal Canin food is actually a very good food. Don't over-analyze the ingredients, especially in prescription diets, it's a wonderful food for this purpose. It would be much worse to try something else and these crystals turn to stones... and then Willow needs surgery. I highly recommend she go on this food full-time when she's an adult.

I'm curious to see if anyone has a food recommendation for their calcium oxalate-crystal dogs... !

Last edited by Holly; 11-26-2011 at 12:27 PM.
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Old 11-26-2011, 01:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Regina83 View Post
Poor Willow has calcium crystals in her urine. They want to put her on a prescription diet ( royal canin). I really hate putting her on this food since there is a lot of corn , by products and it's not a puppy based food. Does anyone know of a food I can feed her besides the prescription diet? The vet said if I can find another food that is lower in calcium I can use that instead. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!
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I am not crazy about the prescription diets either. According to this study in 2002 the hills diet is not even recommended by the The American Journal of Veterinary Research yet the vets are still recommending it. It sounds like you need a diet that is a low-purine diet not low calcium. The foods that are the lowest in purine are all full of calcium. There is a list so you can choose a food that has the right ingredients to give your dog the best chance to recover.
according to the list you might choose venison and sweet potato or rice as a low purine food.
EGGS & DAIRY PRODUCTS
Eggs 5
Egg whites 0
Cheese 6 – 8
Cottage cheese / ricotta cheese 8 – 10
Yogurt 7 – 9

protein
In the past, diets restricted in both protein and phosphorus were thought to reduce the risk of calcium oxalate formation. Studies found, however, that dietary phosphorus restriction increased calcium absorption and the risk of calcium oxalate formation, while higher levels of dietary protein reduced the risk of urolithiasis. Current recommendations for dogs prone to forming CaOx stones say that diets should not be restricted in protein, calcium, or phosphorus.
In February 2002, The American Journal of Veterinary Research published a study conducted at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine’s Minnesota Urolith Center that compared dietary factors in canned food with the formation of calcium oxalate uroliths in dogs, with surprising results. Canned diets with the highest amount of carbohydrate were associated with an increased risk of CaOx urolith formation. Contrary to commonly accepted beliefs, the study concluded that “canned diets formulated to contain high amounts of protein, fat, calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, and moisture and a low amount of carbohydrate may minimize the risk of CaOx urolith formation in dogs.”

In contrast, both Hill’s Canine u/d and Royal Canin Urinary SO, often prescribed for dogs prone to forming CaOx stones, are extremely low in protein, and restrict calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium (Royal Canin is less restrictive than u/d). See The Side Effects of Low Protein Diets for more information.
DogAware.com Articles: Urate, Cystine and Less Common Urinary Stones
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Old 11-26-2011, 01:45 PM
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That's funny because another article in 2002 from the same journal states (regarding prescription K/D for kidney issues) that "those fed a specially formulated dog food (Hill's® Prescription Diet® Canine k/d®) live twice as long as those fed a typical adult grocery dog food. In fact, the benefits for the dogs on the kidney food were so dramatic the study was ended early, and all dogs were shifted to the kidney food."

It would be odd that their research was spot on with K/D and not C/D or S/D... ?


???


Good Luck Regina. My advice will stay put, being that I've seen many dogs and cats do wonderfully on the SO (and C/D) and live long and healthy lives.

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Old 11-26-2011, 03:40 PM
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Thank you for all the input
She has Bru****e Crystals. The vet said that they stay small but could cause pain when urinating. They prescribed Carprofen 25mg twice a day and the SO food for 1-2 months. I can't see spending $50 on a 17lb bag of food. She will go thru that in no time.
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Old 11-26-2011, 07:55 PM
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Prescription diets are expensive... but do wonders when medically managing diseases.

I thought those could cause subsequent formation of Calcium Oxalates... ? *shrug*
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Old 11-26-2011, 10:45 PM
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I can't seem to find much on the type of crystals she has... I did feed her the RC tonight and she didn't eat much of it. I felt bad and fed her the Nutro. Hopefully tomorrow she changes her mind and eats the food!!
I really feel like the TOTW gave her the crystals. It's really high in protein and in salt. Thankfully I took her off of that food a couple weeks ago, it might have been worse IMO.
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Old 11-27-2011, 11:07 AM
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They are not a common type of crystal, from what I know.

Hopefully it was the TOTW and she'll do better off of it.
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Old 11-27-2011, 04:16 PM
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Ok, so the bag of RC says too feed an adult Willows weight 3 1/2 cups a day but nothing about puppies. Willow only gets 2 cups of Nutro... Should I just give 2 cups of the RC as well??
Thank you!!
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Old 11-27-2011, 08:46 PM
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That's funny because another article in 2002 from the same journal states (regarding prescription K/D for kidney issues) that "those fed a specially formulated dog food (Hill's® Prescription Diet® Canine k/d®) live twice as long as those fed a typical adult grocery dog food. In fact, the benefits for the dogs on the kidney food were so dramatic the study was ended early, and all dogs were shifted to the kidney food."
When you compare a special kidney food diet that has very low protein and phosphorus amounts to any normal dog food with normal amounts of protein and phosphorus for healthy dogs, of course the dogs with kidney disease would improve and live longer.

Were you referring to this article? Jacob F, Polzin DJ, Osborne CA, et al. Clinical evaluation of dietary modification for treatment of spontaneous chronic renal failure in dogs. J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220(8):1163-1170

I noticed David J Polzin is listed, according to DVM 360's editors notes it states he has received research sponsorship and speaking honoraria from Hill's Pet Nutrition, Royal Canin, and Nestlé Purina.

It's interesting to me that if Hills was sponsoring the research, his article and research would just happen to find Hills K/d to be such a great product.

I agree with Dawben, I'm not a big fan of the RX diets. For the price, when possible, I think a properly balanced home prepared fresh food diet made to similar dietary guidelines as the RX foods is nutritionally better for an ill dog.

Last edited by Ronny; 11-27-2011 at 08:48 PM.
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