Raising Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky together

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Raising Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky together

This is a discussion on Raising Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky together within the Dog Breeds forums, part of the Other Dogforum Interests category; Hi guys, I've been debating whether to get an Alaskan Malamute or Siberian Husky, but in the end I just decided I'd get both. Now ...

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Old 07-13-2013, 09:55 AM
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Raising Alaskan Malamute and Siberian Husky together

Hi guys,

I've been debating whether to get an Alaskan Malamute or Siberian Husky, but in the end I just decided I'd get both. Now don't get me wrong; I'm not one of those people who act impulsively without thinking of consequences etc. That's why I want to research as much as possible beforehand. I know there's loads of info I can get from this site, but what I really want to know is if it's wise to raise these two breeds at the same time. Would it be more hassle than its worth? Should I get a dog and a bitch? Or two dogs? Anything else I should consider?

I've only ever owned a Labrador and a Staffordshire Bull Terrier in the past (not at the same time) and both were loyal obedient dogs. So I've had experience raising those types of dog, but are the husky/malamute much different in regards to raising them?

Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 07-13-2013, 10:06 AM
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I don't know about raising them together, but i will just say that my boy is has malamute and husky in him (seems to take a bit more on the malamute side) if you haven't done much research into the dogs I would take a look at Dogs 101, I am sure they aren't perfect videos but i am sure they can give you a good idea. I will say one thing though, be prepared for the shedding. My one dog pretty much made it look like winter in our house during his big shed and i believe they are both fairly heavy shedding dogs. I am sure other people will be able to give you better advice.
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Old 07-13-2013, 10:07 AM
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I honestly don't think it would be a good idea to get them both at the same time. Huskies and malamutes are both stubborn, high energy breeds and are a totally different ball park than labs or staffies. Why not wait a year or two between each dog? I'm sure other people have different opinions, but that's mine.
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Old 07-13-2013, 10:09 AM
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If I were you I would get one first, and wait at least 6 months to a year to get the second and to decide if you actually want to get the second. Raising 2 puppies is going to to be very (very!) hard. Especially breeds like the Malamute and Husky.

I find that the sex doesn't matter as much as personalities, just make sure you spay and neuter.

The only real experience I have with Malamutes and Huskies are my best friend had a Malamute growing up. She was great with people, but aggressive with dogs (all dogs). After she passed they rescued a Wolf/Husky who is awesome, but very high drive (she wears a tone collar)
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Old 07-13-2013, 10:17 AM
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2 puppies at the same time is really crazy, insane actually, particularly if you have little experience raising puppies and you are adding the triple challenge of difficult breeds.

Managing two at once through the house training, teething, puppy biting and puppy crazies stages, will be nearly impossible.

I'd do at least a 6 month head start on one of them anyway. If you really want to go through the house training and puppy stages double, at least you would know by then what you are in for.

Remember an adult dog is completely different from a puppy, just as a 25 year old human is totally different from a toddler.
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Old 07-13-2013, 10:25 AM
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Thanks for all the advice guys. The only drawback I had at getting them at different times is that they're both territorial (as with most dogs I suppose) I thought they might get on better if they grew up together, rather than getting one settled and then introducing another into its life.
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Old 07-13-2013, 12:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil123 View Post
Thanks for all the advice guys. The only drawback I had at getting them at different times is that they're both territorial (as with most dogs I suppose) I thought they might get on better if they grew up together, rather than getting one settled and then introducing another into its life.
You'd probably wind up is two very territorial dogs instead of one to deal with, since puppies tend to bond more to each other than their people they'll grow bad habits (and some good) together. It's also kind of a myth that if two dogs grown up together they'll be the best of friends (like with siblings I guess lol).

I'd personally wait (I'm waiting till my pup, Tessa, turns at least two years old so I know she's where I want her to be and she's a little more mature; but that's just me).

Also dogs of varying ages can get along fabulously, you just need to socialize them to different ages/breeds from the get go.
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Old 07-13-2013, 02:30 PM
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I agree with what everyone said. And territory doesn't really play a big role in terms of huskies and mals IMO. They are sledding dogs and were used to be all over the place. (hunting, gather, ect) Plus huskies and malamutes are used to working with more then one dog, so introduction would be a peace of cake. Plus they have training you could use to introduce a new dog to the previous dog. And as for getting one or two, I would wait at least 6 months to 1 yeas to get another one. ^_^ Hope that helps.
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Old 07-13-2013, 02:41 PM
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Very true, Natengen. For all the Huskies I have ever owned, I never had a problem with them getting along with a new Husky being brought into the mix. As you correctly stated, they are working dogs, and they need plenty of exercise, or you will have a destructive dog on your hands.
Huskies are smart, and they can out wit the smartest of owners.
If you do get a Husky, the fur will be a big problem, we use to card the fur and make the warmest sweaters. 1 dog= i sweater.
I would wait to get another Husky or Mal. Raise one not two.
Others have given great advice about raising 2 pups at the same time.
Have you done research on the breeds?
Are you able to give them the proper exercise that they need, and it is an insane amount that a Husky needs. That is why we raced them, and trained them.
It takes a special person to raise a Siberian. There are always exceptions to the rule, as we have some very nice Huskies here raised by wonderful owners.
This is a breed that is not for everyone.
Good luck, but please. get one only, and get him/her from a reputable breeder.
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Old 07-13-2013, 03:00 PM
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Mostly dogs don't get truly territorial until they are at least at puberty (6 to 12 months) if not actually until social maturity, which might be a couple of years old. That's the least of your worries.... and besides, the dogs may or may not get along as adults even if raised together.

Again, if you have not raised a puppy before, you would do well to try one first. Go over to the "puppy help" section and read a bit of what you are in for, even with a single pup!
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Last edited by Tess; 07-13-2013 at 03:03 PM.
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