Great danes and English Mastiffs

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Great danes and English Mastiffs

This is a discussion on Great danes and English Mastiffs within the Dog Breeds forums, part of the Other Dogforum Interests category; I am down to choosing either a great dane or english mastiff (well 95% sure), and I know they are very similar but what are ...

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Old 05-03-2012, 09:58 PM
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Great danes and English Mastiffs

I am down to choosing either a great dane or english mastiff (well 95% sure), and I know they are very similar but what are some things that set them apart other than size?

Does one breed in general drool/shed/anything like that more?

Ive noticed that mastiffs general life expectancy is longer than the great dane, how do they compare on health?
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Old 05-03-2012, 10:44 PM
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they are very different dogs.
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Last edited by dusto; 05-03-2012 at 10:48 PM.
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Old 05-03-2012, 10:50 PM
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From what most I read they are very similar, I guess ive been reading the wrong stuff/deducting the wrong thing from the sites. My bad, thanks for the quick response dusto.

Those two questions still pertain, because I still love both dogs and more likely than not will choose between the two.

Thanks in advance for the help!
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Old 05-04-2012, 09:57 AM
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I prefer Great Danes

I prefer Great Danes. I have a Great Dane and I wouldn't take a $1,000,000 for him. My dog's picture is on this site.
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Old 05-05-2012, 08:52 AM
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ok here is what i think. we were chosing between great dane and eng. mastiff too.

1- mastiffs are more prone to be drooly than danes. there are always exceptions to the rule, but this is in general.

2- if you have a well bred dane, you can get 10-13yrs out of them. my fiences uncle had to put down his dane at 13, and he has a 9yr old right now who you would think is 3. my chloe just turned 5 and was from a bad breeder, she has bad arthritis these days. my other dane will be 5 in 3 months and has no issues at all. mastiffs average 10 to 12 yrs. so overall they have a couple years more. but you have to remember breeding and health and nutrition have a LOT to do with how long your dog will live.

3- as far as health, the mastiffs tend to have health problems more often, i feel. they both can have a slue of problems so you need a breeder whos goal is not just looks, but health as well.

4- mastiffs tend to not be very social with other dogs. theyre not big fans of the dog park or dog daycare. danes tend to do a little better with these things. though like i said, this doesnt speak for ALL of them.

to me, its danes. hands down. i have 2. they are just amazing and they changed my life. my fiance didnt want a big dog at all when we started looking at dogs. after we got chloe, 5 months later we got another dane pup. today, we would never own anything else. and we both know it. we already have a breeder in line for our next danes.
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Old 05-07-2012, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by GreatDaneMom View Post
ok here is what i think. we were chosing between great dane and eng. mastiff too.

1- mastiffs are more prone to be drooly than danes. there are always exceptions to the rule, but this is in general.

2- if you have a well bred dane, you can get 10-13yrs out of them. my fiences uncle had to put down his dane at 13, and he has a 9yr old right now who you would think is 3. my chloe just turned 5 and was from a bad breeder, she has bad arthritis these days. my other dane will be 5 in 3 months and has no issues at all. mastiffs average 10 to 12 yrs. so overall they have a couple years more. but you have to remember breeding and health and nutrition have a LOT to do with how long your dog will live.

3- as far as health, the mastiffs tend to have health problems more often, i feel. they both can have a slue of problems so you need a breeder whos goal is not just looks, but health as well.

4- mastiffs tend to not be very social with other dogs. theyre not big fans of the dog park or dog daycare. danes tend to do a little better with these things. though like i said, this doesnt speak for ALL of them.

to me, its danes. hands down. i have 2. they are just amazing and they changed my life. my fiance didnt want a big dog at all when we started looking at dogs. after we got chloe, 5 months later we got another dane pup. today, we would never own anything else. and we both know it. we already have a breeder in line for our next danes.
How many mastiffs have/do you own. Ive had 3 and they are all great. Dog park friendly, people friendly.

You really need to dissuade this bullok from wanting one of these dogs. Nobody who is LAZY should own a dog that needs hours of attention.


And OP. You need to talk to people who can give you advise. The reading is not very accurate. Anyone who hears your story will tell you not to get a dog.

Pushing your lazy lifestyle on a dog is mean. And if money is an issue, you shouldn't have either of these breeds (Or maybe even a dog in general).
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Old 05-07-2012, 04:49 PM
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How many mastiffs have/do you own. Ive had 3 and they are all great. Dog park friendly, people friendly.

You really need to dissuade this bullok from wanting one of these dogs. Nobody who is LAZY should own a dog that needs hours of attention.


And OP. You need to talk to people who can give you advise. The reading is not very accurate. Anyone who hears your story will tell you not to get a dog.

Pushing your lazy lifestyle on a dog is mean. And if money is an issue, you shouldn't have either of these breeds (Or maybe even a dog in general).
youre extrememly rude. you have no right telling anyone what they can and can not have and calling them names. ive known many many mastiffs. i manage a dog daycare and am a dog trainer. im speaking from experience. you are just being mean.
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Old 05-07-2012, 05:04 PM
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two opposite breeds for college student -- so you tell me, is having a backyard a reason to have a dog? Doesn't want to walk it, worried about money for food....

now here is someone that sounds more responsible. you do the math:

Selecting a dog for my situation

Last edited by dusto; 05-07-2012 at 05:10 PM.
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Old 05-07-2012, 05:49 PM
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Let's see.

English Mastiff: (from Wiki)

Body

Quote:
The body is large with great depth and breadth, especially between the forelegs, causing these to be set wide apart. The AKC standard height (per their website) for this breed is 30 inches (76 cm) at the shoulder for males and 27.5 inches (70 cm) (minimum) at the shoulder for females. A typical male can weigh 175–190 pounds (79–86 kg) although some can reach over 220, a typical female can weigh 120–170 pounds (54–77 kg).[2]
Temperament

Quote:
The Mastiff breed has a desired temperament, which is reflected in all formal standards and historical descriptions.[6] Though calm and affectionate to its master, it is capable of protection. If an unfamiliar person approaches near the Mastiff's perceived territory or its master, ideally, it would protect its master. If the approaching person is perceived as a threat, the Mastiff may take immediate defensive action by placing itself between its master and using a "warning growl" although some will actually hide behind their master and issue their intimidating growl from there. Mastiffs, even fearless ones, will rarely attack an intruder or perceived threat (unless severely provoked) and instead will generally pin the individual until a human they know arrives and tells them it is ok. Mastiffs are good natured, calm, easygoing, and surprisingly gentle for their size. They are a very sensitive breed, and as such harsh training methods and discipline are not recommended. It is a well-mannered house pet, requiring minimal daily exercise and activity. The Mastiff is typically an extremely loyal breed, exceptionally devoted to its family and good with children and small dogs and is often described by owners as "their giant teddy bear."
Health

Quote:
The Mastiff is a particularly large dog demanding correct diet and exercise. Excessive running is not recommended for the first two years of the dog's life. However, regular exercise must be maintained throughout the dog's life in order to discourage slothful behavior and to prevent a number of health problems. A soft surface is recommended for the dog to sleep on in order to prevent the development of calluses, arthritis, and hygroma (an acute inflammatory swelling). Due to the breed's large size, puppies may potentially be smothered or crushed by the mother during nursing. A whelping box, along with careful monitoring can prevent such accidents. The average lifespan of the Mastiff is about 7 years although it's not uncommon for some to live to 10–11 years.[7]
Major problems can include hip dysplasia and gastric torsion. Minor problems include obesity, osteosarcoma, and cystinuria. Problems only occasionally found include cardiomyopathy, allergies, vaginal hyperplasia, cruciate ligament rupture, hypothyroidism, OCD, entropion, progressive retinal atrophy (PRA), and persistent pupillary membranes (PPM).
When purchasing a purebred Mastiff, experts often suggest that the dog undergo tests for hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, thyroid, and DNA for PRA.
Great Danes: (from Wiki)

Body

Quote:
he male dog should not be less than 30 in (76 cm) at the shoulders, a female 28 in (71 cm). Danes under minimum height are disqualified.[4]

The minimum weight for a Great Dane over eighteen months is 120 lb (54 kg) for males, 100 lb (45 kg) for females.[5][7] Unusually, the American Kennel Club dropped the minimum weight requirement from its standard.[8] The male should appear more massive throughout than the female, with a larger frame and heavier bone.[4]
Temperament

Quote:
The Great Dane's large and imposing appearance belies its friendly nature; the breed is often referred to as a gentle giant.[4] Great Danes are generally well-disposed toward other dogs, other non-canine pets, and humans. They generally do not exhibit a high prey drive.[10] The Great Dane is a very gentle and loving animal with proper care and training.
Health

Quote:
Like most dogs, Great Danes require daily walks to remain healthy. However it is important not to over exercise this breed, particularly when young. Great Dane puppies grow very large, very fast, which puts them at risk of joint and bone problems. Because of a puppy's natural energy, Dane owners often take steps to minimize activity while the dog is still growing.[11][12]
Given their large size, Great Danes continue to grow (mostly gaining weight) longer than most dogs. Even at one year of age a Great Dane will continue to grow for several more months.[12]
Great Danes are prone to bloat. Bloat is a serious condition in which the stomach distends and/or rotates effectively cutting of the blood supply to various part of the body including the stomach, spleen and other organs.. If not treated almost immediately, usually by surgery, the condition can be fatal. Left untreated, death usually occurs within a matter of hours.[13] There is conflicting information about how the condition is caused. It is often suggested that in order to prevent bloat Great Danes should be fed multiple small meals throughout the day as opposed to one large one and that they be prevented from engaging in vigorous exercise following meals.[13]

Great Danes, like most giant dogs, have a fairly slow metabolism. This results in less energy and less food consumption per pound of dog than in small breeds. Great Danes have some health problems that are common to large breeds, including gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) (a painful distending and twisting of the stomach). This is a critical condition that can affect Great Danes and other deep-chested breeds, and which may cause death if not quickly addressed. Drinking large amounts of fluid in a short period of time can provoke GDV in Great Danes, as well as other larger breeds of dogs. It is a commonly recommended practice for Great Danes to have their stomachs tacked (Gastropexy) to the right abdominal wall if the dog or its relatives have a history of GDV, though some veterinary surgeons will not do the operation if the actual sickness has not occurred. New studies have shown that elevated food bowls do not help abate bloating, like first believed. When the bowl is elevated, the dog can eat faster, and therefore swallow more air, so new studies suggest that leaving the food on the ground will help the dog eat slower. Another opportunity could be to spread the food on the ground or on the grass. [14] Refraining from exercise or activity immediately before and after meals may also reduce risk, although this has not been validated with research. Signs that GDV may have occurred include, but are not limited to, visible distension (enlargement of the abdomen) and repeated retching that resembles repetitive non-productive attempts to vomit. GDV is a condition that is distinct from another condition referred to as bloat, though bloat may precede the development of GDV. GDV is a surgical emergency; immediate veterinary evaluation should be sought if a dog demonstrates signs of this condition.
The average life span of Great Danes is 6 to 8 years.[15][16]
Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and many congenital heart diseases are also commonly found in the Great Dane, leading to its nickname: the Heartbreak breed, in conjunction with its shorter lifespan. Great Danes also suffer from several genetic disorders that are specific to the breed. For example, if a Great Dane lacks color (is white) near its eyes or ears, then that organ may not develop and usually the dog will be either blind, deaf, or both.[17]
They sound completely different. The only thing they have in common is some medical issues, exercise warnings, and size.

IMO these are not the breeds you are looking for. Not only do bigger dogs have more health issues but they cost a LOT more money to keep and maintain. When it says Great Dane's have a slow metabolism and don't eat as much they are NOT comparing it to a chihuahua's daily intake!

If you get a Great Dane will you be there to feed it multiple meals throughout the day? Trust me, your room mate's WILL NOT do this. And moving out of your current place is going to be extra hard because of huuuuge dogs. Most places won't allow them and the first time your giant dog starts barking be prepared for complaints (not only about barking, but with the mastiff it could also be 'aggression' complaints).

More than likely the appeal of that 'lazy' dog you are looking for is what drew you to these breeds. There is no such thing as a lazy dog. When they say 'this dog requires less exercise and would do well in an apartment' they mean 'unlike other breeds this dog only requires one thirty-hour walk a day and is content to laze around afterwards. In fact, it may only need an hour's worth of backyard playtime and maybe five minutes of trick training! it's so lazy!'
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Old 05-07-2012, 07:12 PM
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two opposite breeds for college student -- so you tell me, is having a backyard a reason to have a dog? Doesn't want to walk it, worried about money for food....

now here is someone that sounds more responsible. you do the math:

Selecting a dog for my situation
if you go around insulting people, rather than educating them youll make no impact.

if you walk up to someone and tell them "you cant have that piece of candy because youre too fat", they will most likely eat it anyway just to spite you. as i said in the other thread, if someone tells me i cant- i will. being nasty doesnt get you anywhere with people, they are more likely to ignore you and shut you out, rather than educating and speaking kindly. not criticizing and being rude. last i checked this was a FRIENDLY forum.
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