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This is a discussion on All About Your breed(s) within the Dog Breeds forums, part of the Other Dogforum Interests category; Breed: Belgian Sheepdog (Groenendael) Size: AKC Standard: Males 24-26 inches (not under 22 1/2 or over 27 1/2) Females 22-24 inches (not to be under ...

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Old 05-21-2014, 08:29 PM
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Breed: Belgian Sheepdog (Groenendael)
Size: AKC Standard: Males 24-26 inches (not under 22 1/2 or over 27 1/2) Females 22-24 inches (not to be under 20 1/2 or over 25 1/2) Length is equal to height, bitches can be slightly longer.
Color: Black ( Small white stripe or star allowed on chest, frosting on toes and muzzle also allowed)
Grooming Requirements: Belgians are a double coated breed with a twice a year HUGE shed. Weekly grooming will keep them from matting and their coat tangling, if being shown then you are bathing once a week usually, otherwise they really only need a bath when they smell or have rolled in sheep poop *looks at Debit*
Energy Level: Dogs vary as individuals but for the most part are on a range of medium energy (walks everyday and games) to the whole spectrum of high energy, from low to crazy.
Temperament: Highly inquisitive, intuitive to its owner (you will never go to the bathroom alone to try to escape through the emergency hatch, responds best to positive, reward based training. *WARNING TO THE UNWARY-Belgians learn very well by watching other dogs, the good, the bad, and the ugly. Fiercely loyal to their family and can be highly protective.
Health: Epilepsy, MDR1 gene, hip and elbow dysplasia, Collie Eye, and Cancer
Breed History: Known as le Berger Belge- the Belgian Shepherd, the breed has been in existence since the 1500's and is from a geographic region that was called the Pays-Bas which encompasses the low countries of Belgium and Holland. In 1891 three coat types were identified in the Belgian Shepherd: long, short, and harsh. There were no restrictions on color but all the dogs had the same structure and appearance: medium sized, pricked eared, and all had evolved to herd the sheep of Belgium. Later that same year a new breed club decided on color restrictions and named the dogs based on regions of Belgium that they originated from. Long haired black-Groenendael, Short haired fawn with black overlay-Malinois, and the harsh coated greys-Laekenois. The other colors and the long haired fawns -Tervuren formed their own club to be identified. The first recorded Belgian arrival in the US is 1911. In 1959, the AKC votes that only the black dogs shall be called Belgian Sheepdogs. It wasn't until 1983 that three (Groenendael, Malinois, and Tervuren) of the four varities become part of the Herding Group and the Laekenois has only been recently listed in the FSS of the AKC.
what should potential owners be aware of: The long search that could be involved for looking for a good breeder is worth it. With so many potential health problems and with so many of those being passed through bloodlines take the time to find a breeder who does health screenings. CERF, OFA, Heart, Thyroid and full disclosure of any seizing dogs in their breeding program. You also really want to know all about the temperament of their dogs as well. Belgians can be all over the place sadly with temperament if not bred correctly.
Anything else? They aren't for everyone, but if you truly enjoy having a dog that thinks you are the fuzzy part of the Velcro strip that they need to put their weird little plastic hooks in then they are a breed to be considered. They are also truly a breed that is only limited be their owner. They can do any and everything that you can imagine.
What is your breed experience: Personally own one (will always have a Belgian), fostered, and have been a puppy socializer for the same breeder for 8 years.
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Old 05-21-2014, 09:21 PM
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Folks, This is a great thread, but please remember to only use original photos and content. IF you post a photo or copy text, you need to provide a LINK. Thank you.

Last edited by crock; 05-22-2014 at 01:52 PM.
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Old 05-22-2014, 01:03 AM
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Victoria is my only current purebred. I'll put in here that I'm not a small, unathletic dog breed fan but Tory has so won me over I am doing this in her honor. She is a purebred pug that was abandoned into my care.



Breed: Pug

Size: Ideally 14-18lbs, although they have problems with obesity and many weigh more. Victoria is a smaller-than-average pug at 12lbs.

Colors: Shades of fawn w/mask, black.

Grooming requirements: Very little, however some pugs are prone to infections in facial skin folds and require the owner to clean the folds with, say, a Q-Tip regularly. They shed like it's their job.

Energy level: Their personality invites more exercise than many can physically handle. Keep your pug fit and active right from the start and you will have a dog that can handle slow, short hikes in nice weather and a few games of fetch in the yard.
Ahem, special mention to Victoria: She's five now and has slowed down but up until she was about 4 1/2 this dog could climb mountains, run agility courses and swim her little puggy heart out. She couldn't do more than two miles on hilly, rough terrain without a break but she absolutely loved it anyways. She still enjoys hiking now but doesn't try to run the whole way like she did as a young dog.

Temperament: Goofy, happy (freakishly happy), manipulative--extremely manipulative--sweet, friendly, with a tendency toward alarm/alert barking. Velcro-type dogs, however they are a little too self-serving much of the time to dote on you completely. They are very smart but don't always use their smarts to listen to you or do what you want. Victoria worships all the humans in the house, but does so with her love, not her obedience. Some have a tendency towards bravery that borders on stupidity, but some can be cautious as well. Victoria has gained wisdom with age. How she survived puppyhood is a miracle just about unequaled.

Breed history: Chinese origins, bred as pets for monks and emperors, then eventually made their way over to Europe with the same occupation. One of the oldest dog breeds.

What should potential first time owners be aware of? Brachy breed, will have breathing problems eventually, that arise either in specific situations or as a permanent issue. Eye prolapse. Hip dysplasia. Can't do extreme, physically demanding sports. Shed like crazy and can be yappy. Don't usually do well in extremely hot climates. More susceptible to demodex and NME.

Anything else? Pick a breeder who doesn't obsess over flat faces. While flat faces and huge eyes are the current trend, I suggest looking for a breeder who keeps the dog's health as a primary guide in breeding. Huge, bulgy eyes are more prone to prolapse and the flatter the face the greater probability of breathing problems.

What is your breed experience? I own one dog personally from 5ish months to present day, when she is 5 years old. Additionally, pug-people are very gregarious in my experience and I've been regaled with story after story of people's pugs, been to a couple breed meets and met a lot of them.
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Old 05-22-2014, 05:47 PM
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Breed: Miniature Australian Shepherd

Size: About 30lbs

Colors: Blue Merel, Red Merel, Black and Tan, Red and Tan

Grooming requirements: I bathe mine just about once a week but generally they just need a good bath and brushing as needed. I also trim the hair on the feet of him

Energy level: Mine is rather lazy but most Aussie's are pretty high energy

Temperament: (I Work at a Dog Groomers) From what I've seen the younger ones tend to be a little on the skiddish high energy side but as they get older they calm down.

Breed history: Australian Shepherds came the U.S. on ships with Australian Sheep but they are from England. Overtime breeders bred them down to a smaller size

What should potential first time owners be aware of? With Aussies they are very smart and can get bored which can lead to undesired and destructive behaviors. Make sure they get plenty of stimulation (Having other dogs can help)

Anything else? They're very lovable and will steal your heart

What is your breed experience? I own a Miniature Aussie (The top one is mine, the middle is his father, the bottom is his mother)
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Old 05-22-2014, 09:47 PM
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Breed: Rat Terrier

Size:

Miniature - At least 10-13 inches; Standard - over 13-18 inches in height measured at the shoulder. Generally 10 to 25 pounds.


Colors:

Any form of pied, in colors such as black,
chocolate, red, apricot, blue, fawn, tan, or lemon.

Grooming requirements:

Easy, their short coat allows for a quick brush here and there. They shed seasonally.

Energy level: medium-high

Temperament:

Devoted, bold, very intelligent, trainable, big dog in a little body, feisty

Breed history:

(From the AKC website, http://https://www.akc.org/breeds/rat_terrier/index.cfm) An American breed, the Rat Terrier was created by immigrants using a mixture of crosses of old time Fox Terriers and other European Terriers common in the 19th century; the Old English White Terrier, Manchester Terrier, Bull Terrier, etc.; and later more Smooth Fox Terrier, Beagle, Toy Fox Terriers, Whippets and Italian Greyhounds. From 1910 through the "dust bowl" era of the 1930s, the Rat Terrier was one of the most common farm dogs, used for ratting, hunting varmints and other work.

What should potential first time owners be aware of?

That they are not some little lapdog, and they do need a LOT of exercise/mental stimulation. Rat Terriers are also very spunky, quirky little dogs. They will keep you entertained and on your feet at the same time. They can get carried away in play, so you do need to make sure they realize the limits when playing. And walk away when they get to carried away. Also, they will chase everything, being a hunting breed.

Anything else?

They are fantastic dogs that, when their mental/physical needs are met, and are absolutely amazing.

They really are big dogs in a small package, which makes them perfect for taking places because of portability, and excellent for someone who wants a more active dog, thats not too big. They are great to take hiking . And they constantly are looking to you to see what you want of them.

Oh, always have them on leash outside, they will take off after things and not come until they decide they're done chasing/checking out what it is. We will not have our girl, even out in the country where we are, off leash, even in the front yard.

And, they truly need to have someone who is able to spend a lot of time with them because they become very attached to their people and crave that companionship.
What is your breed experience? (ie I owned one dog, I bred the breed, etc)

I own one currently
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Old 05-22-2014, 11:38 PM
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Great idea! Good to see how breeds vary from the 'standards'

Breed: Cavoodle

Size: Toy: 23-28cm at the shoulder in height and 4-6kg in weight. Miniature: 29-35cm in height and 8-12kg in weight.

Colors: Assorted colours - Can be any variation of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel or Poodle colouration.

Grooming requirements: Daily grooming is recommended, but I find that you can get away with 3-4 times a week without any issues.

Energy level: Generally quite quiet. A daily walk is recommended but it had been found that most take after the Cavalier in terms of energy levels and are quite happy to laze around the house.

Health issues: Both Cavaliers and Poodles are generally prone to health problems, but by crossbreeding the two these health issues are quite often bypassed, however slipping kneecaps, eye defects and congenital heart issues are the most common problems in regards to both Cavaliers and Poodles.

Temperament: The gentle Cavalier nature blends really well with the boisterous temperament of poodles. Cavoodles tend to be playful and fun but also gentle and love to laze around with you and sit on your lap. They are very boisterous puppies though! Bundles of energy and razor sharp teeth that they love to use! It can sometimes be difficult to toilet train Cavoodles because of their size (smaller bladder = not being able to hold it very long!)

Breed history: Cavoodles are a cross breed of the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and either a Toy or Miniature Poodle.

What should potential first time owners be aware of? Cavoodles are a very social dog and LOVE human company. If you wanting a dog that will be independent and not be your constant shadow, a Cavoodle is not for you. Cavoodles are boisterous puppies and can be somewhat difficult to manage, despite their calm nature as an adult.

Anything else? As the Cavoodle is a cross breed (or designer dog) it comes in multiple variations in terms of temperament and appearance. Nothing is standard.

What is your breed experience? Own one, and have been around multiple pups and dogs before, as a friend of the family is a Cavoodle breeder.
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Old 05-23-2014, 10:46 AM
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@avietar I've never heard of White Swiss Shepherds. I love their look/temperament!

I'm glad @Laurelin did shelties too! Riley has so many typical and a-typical characteristics, that it's difficult for me to speak for the breed as a whole (esp. since he's my first dog).



Breed: Shetland Sheepdog

Size: Small - Medium (Riley is oversized at 18")

Colors: Mahogany Sable. Just to add to Laurelin's list, they also come in bi black, bi blue and sable merle.

Grooming requirements: Medium - High. I would consider Riley's grooming req. as medium since he doesn't have much of an undercoat like some shelties do. I do a thorough brushing bi-weekly with quick brush-throughs in between. He does occasionally get matts by his ear fluff. A bath during shedding season usually helps remove all the loose fur.

Energy level: Medium- High. Riley is one of those dogs who will go go go and doesn't know when to stop. At the same time he has a good off-switch and has been managing 1 hour walks on weekdays now that I'm working. Ideally, he would get 2 hours + of exercise a day.

Temperament: The first words that come to mind are playful and alert. Riley is very much up for anything. He is fearful of strangers who approach him on walks but is otherwise very friendly (he loves dogs, people with dogs and house guests). Very biddable and easy to train- very sensitive to tone of voice as well.

Breed history: Originated from the Shetland Island and bred to be small, like the Shetland Pony, in order to reduce cost of living.

What should potential first time owners be aware of? The importance of socialization! They can also be motion sensitive. Riley rarely reacts to cars, but if one zooms past out of no where, he may try to chase it. Riley isn't much of a barker, but one of the main comments I get from people is: "Does he bark?", so I suppose that says something about the breeds reputation as a whole . Oh, but when he does bark, it is loud and piercing.

Anything else? Overall, I think they are a great first-time dog for a home who wants an active and engaged companion.

What is your breed experience? First dog.
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Old 05-23-2014, 11:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Rileysaur View Post
avietar I've never heard of White Swiss Shepherds. I love their look/temperament!
Outside of FCI countries they're not really well known.

They used to be called 'Canadian white shepherd' actually (I saw you're from Canada) so maybe you're familiar with that name?

In any case, they've been called (and still are called) many names, like north American white shepherd, American Canadian white shepherd, simply white shepherd, or white German shepherd. Some people, especially those that aren't familiar with white Swiss shepherds, will say they're just white GSDs. While that was once the case, not so anymore.

They are slightly larger, don't have the whole angulation-thing going on, have two coat types (and the longhairs are starting to outnumber the shorthairs) and they have different temperaments. GSDs are a working breed, white Swiss shepherds are bred to be active companions. You'll rarely, if ever, find a white Swiss shepherd doing police work or schutzhund. They're too soft for that, true carpet-knights.
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Old 05-23-2014, 12:13 PM
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American English Coonhound

American English Coonhound Page


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General Appearance
Renowned for speed and endurance, the American English Coonhound has a strong but racy body, a deep chest with plenty of lung room, a strong back, broad loin and well-defined musculature. A balanced, powerful dog with no exaggerated parts, the American English possesses the grace and attitude of a well-conditioned athlete.
Size, Proportion, Substance
Size-Height-Males-24 to 26 inches at the withers. Females-23 to 25 inches at the withers. Proportion-Measuring from the breast bone to the rear of the thigh and the withers to the ground, the length should be equal or slightly longer than the height measurement. Slightly off square. Substance-Weight in proportion to height so the dog appears capable of an all night hunt.
Head
The head is broad and of moderate length. Expression-Kind, houndy. Eyes-Dark brown pigmentation, wide apart. Fault: Drooping lids. Ears-Hung rather low, reaching nearly at the end of the nose when drawn out. Fine texture, soft to the touch. Faults: Flat, stiff to the touch cocked. Skull-Very slightly domed, broad between the ears. Fault: Narrow skull. Stop-Prominent. Muzzle-Rather square, well proportioned in width with the skull. Flews covering the lower jaw from the side view. Planes-The stop forms a right angle with the upper line of the muzzle. A line from occiput to brow is a little above, and parallel to a line from eye to nose. Nose-Black. Faults: Pink or white pigmentation. Bite-Scissors bite with upper incisors fitting closely over the lower. Disqualifications: Undershot or overshot.
Neck, Topline, Body
Neck-Muscular, moderate length, fits smoothly into the shoulders and rising with a slight taper to the skull. Carriage-Moderate, reaching slightly forward in the trot. Faults: Neck carried overly high or low. Thickness at shoulders. Topline-Slightly higher at withers than at hips. Strong. Chest- Should reach to the elbow. Shows considerable depth rather than excessive width, allowing optimum lung space. Ribs-Well-sprung with good depth, tapering gradually to floating ribs. Underline and Tuck up-Tight and smooth without exaggeration. Fault: Sagging underline. Back-Muscular, blending well with the neck when the head is held alertly. Fault: Roached. Loin-Broad, well muscled. Tail-Set high, carried gaily but not hooked over back. Medium length, slight brush. Faults: Plume or rat tail.
Forequarters
Shoulders and Angulation-Clean, gradually sloped down from the withers to the point of shoulder, muscular, balanced with body, showing freedom of movement and strength. Fault: Protruding shoulders. Forelegs-Straight from side or front view, well boned, set well apart, muscular. Pastern-Strong and straight. Feet-Set directly under leg, round, catlike, well-padded, strong arch over toes. Nails-Strong.
Hindquarters
Angulation-in balance with the forequarters. Legs-Strong, straight when viewed from the rear. Thigh-muscular without being coarse.
Coat
Hard, protective hair. Medium length.
Color
Red and white ticked, blue and white ticked, tri-colored with ticking, red and white, white and black. Disqualifications: Tri-colored with no ticking, solid color with less than 10% ticking, any brindle color.
Gait
Effortless trot, with reach and drive, with tail moving side to side. Gives impression of great endurance. Head carried up, but not perpendicular. Expression is alert.
Temperament
Pleasant, alert, confident and sociable with humans and dogs. An avid hunter. Faults: Shyness or timidity.
Disqualifications
Undershot, overshot, tri-colored with no ticking, solid color with less than 10% ticking, any brindle color
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Old 05-23-2014, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by avietar View Post
Outside of FCI countries they're not really well known.

They used to be called 'Canadian white shepherd' actually (I saw you're from Canada) so maybe you're familiar with that name?

In any case, they've been called (and still are called) many names, like north American white shepherd, American Canadian white shepherd, simply white shepherd, or white German shepherd. Some people, especially those that aren't familiar with white Swiss shepherds, will say they're just white GSDs. While that was once the case, not so anymore.

They are slightly larger, don't have the whole angulation-thing going on, have two coat types (and the longhairs are starting to outnumber the shorthairs) and they have different temperaments. GSDs are a working breed, white Swiss shepherds are bred to be active companions. You'll rarely, if ever, find a white Swiss shepherd doing police work or schutzhund. They're too soft for that, true carpet-knights.
Hmm.. they may just creep onto my "next dog" list! I like the fact that they have that confident and protective look with that soft temperament! I'm definitely going to do some more research on them!
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